Domestic Violence

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marilyna

Guest
Read this today, and I am all for it

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/mar/05/national-rollout-clares-law-delayed

In reality, I wonder how many women would check their partners out, though.

My sister lives across the pond, and told me that it is common for people to do background checks on each other before they start dating. I think that is intrusive. Reading this article has made me change my view.

It would be great if women could do a check on Tunisian love rats before they entered into a relationship with them.
 
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Galadriel

Guest
I was vetted by my husbands sister, two of them sent the third one across the pond to give me the once over ! she asked around got the low down on me and slept between us initially when he came back over here to ask me to marry him, wierd or what eh?
 
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marilyna

Guest
That is weird, sleeping between you lol. Nothing came up in the low down then;) I think with the background checks that my sister told me about, they can pull out all sorts of information on you from a database. It makes me wonder how acceptable it is for a potential partner to access that information without your consent, but then I guess if it is in the public domain, you have no choice. I am all for checking if someone has a history of domestic violence though, as I would not want to end up dead, like the woman in the article.
 
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Galadriel

Guest
That is weird, sleeping between you lol. Nothing came up in the low down then;) I think with the background checks that my sister told me about, they can pull out all sorts of information on you from a database. It makes me wonder how acceptable it is for a potential partner to access that information without your consent, but then I guess if it is in the public domain, you have no choice. I am all for checking if someone has a history of domestic violence though, as I would not want to end up dead, like the woman in the article.
Yes I would want to find out about domestic violence. Don`t know how it works but before buying a business we went to local police for info on what local criminals were up to and they told us ! People in the community filled us in on the rest. Would they do this for domestic violence ?
 
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marilyna

Guest
That is what it sounds like that women would be able to ask the police if their partner or future partner is listed on the database. I would never have considered this before, but in this day and age, maybe this is the way forward.
 
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Galadriel

Guest
That is what it sounds like that women would be able to ask the police if their partner or future partner is listed on the database. I would never have considered this before, but in this day and age, maybe this is the way forward.
Claire`s Law has been passed, women who have concerns about their partners past can now go to the police and ask for background info. Family members and or concerned friends cannot ask for this info. This was blocked. A somewhat positive move forwards though. Spread the word Ladies. Sorry only passed in certain areas. I can tell you if I needed this info and didn`t live in an area where it was "live" I would be thumping the desk in my local cop shop that`s for sure but also I do think I would not be with a guy that had even the slightest hint of background or previous. The old line goes are they kind to animals, wonder how often this holds true?
 

Amber

oo la la ;)
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Ariel

Guest
An endemic disease: Violence against Women in Tunisia
NAU
Thursday, March 1st 2012

One in five women, is abused at least once in her life reports La Presse de Tunisie.The first national survey on violence against women in Tunisia, conducted in 2010 by Onfp with support from the Spanish Agency for International Development and CAWTAR, has revealed the extent of the problem.


A meeting was held by the National Family and Population Association in the presence of Mr. Abdellatif Makki, Minister of Health, His Excellency the Ambassador of the Kingdom of Spain Mr. Antonio Perez Cosano, the Director General of AECI, Mr Guillermo Caro and representatives of relevant ministries, UN organizations and other governmental and nongovernmental and civil society. Conducted among a representative sample of the Tunisian population consisting of 3,873 women aged 18 to 64, seven living areas (District of Tunis, Northeast, Northwest, Central East, Midwest, Southeast, Southwest), the survey, based on a questionnaire, reveals that violence comes in many forms (physical, psychological, sexual and economic) and that physical violence is the most common followed by emotional abuse. Sexual violence is third followed by economic violence.

The subject is still taboo. 42 per cent of abused women have never spoken about their experience. The reasons range from shame and fear or resignation many women keep the violence suffered especially from their husband. 73 per cent expect no help from anyone and the most common incidence of the of abuse is the family. Nearly 18 per cent have complained. The extent of violence against women in Tunisia, always sensed but never quantified, is now known.The figures are alarming as 47.6 per cent of women aged 18 to 64 reported suffering at least one form of violence during their lifetime.

The survey reveals that the intimate partner (husband, boyfriend or friend) appears as the main aggressor: 47 per centof cases of physical violence and 68.5 per cent of cases of emotional abuse, 78 per cent of cases of sexual violence and about 78per cent of cases of economic violence. The intimate space is designated by the survey as the first sphere of violence against women, followed from the family responsible for 43 per cent of cases of physical abuse, 22 per cent of cases of economic abuse and 16 per cent of cases of psychological violence. Public spaces including the workplace are in third place with 21 per cent of cases of sexual violence, nearly 15 per cent of cases of emotional abuse and nearly 10 per cent of cases of physical violence. The survey also indicates that by marital status of women, the prevalence of violence in all its forms is more important against divorced women followed by married women. Unmarried women are the least victimized. It is in the south-west of Tunisia that the prevalence is highest (up to 72 per cent) while the lowest is in the Central East (nearly 36 per cent). The results of the survey show that one in five women has experienced physical violence at least once in a lifetime and one in six women had been sexually abused.

The violence rankst economic difficulties first with unemployed husbands and low educational level of women for couples, jealousy for singles the prevalence of violence increases with age but decreases when the partner's educational level of the latter increases.Very few women go to NGOs.

The consequences of violence on women are physical, mental and social. 27 per cent of abused women interviewed report difficulty concentrating, 56 per cent have difficulties in their daily life and 2 per cent said they had abandoned their work. Yet many women do not speak of the violence, do not trust and do not complain, the survey indicates. 55 per cent of women surveyed said that "violence is a regular feature that is not worth talking about." However, fear of aggravating the situation and are ashamed to speak also of the reasons mentioned but less frequently. For these women, the only recourse is the family. The proportion of women who turn to NGOs does not exceed 5.4 per cent. As for the police and health facilities, the survey indicates that they are poorly identified by women.

For health professionals, sociologists, psychologists, feminist organizations and the Ministry of Women, the survey is of paramount importance. Establishing an inventory, the first of its kind, violence against women and identifying the determinants and consequences of violence as well as profiles of women most at risk and the effects of violence on their health and their daily lives, "it will be possible relevant structures and associations to take care of this problem," says Dorra Mahfoudh, sociologist. But not without the aid of the abused woman who, according to Ms. Rim Ben Aissa, gynecologist and director at Onfp must be aware of the interest to talk about and denounce. "If she does not mention it, this phenomenon will continue," she says while stressing the need to discuss this problem and to demystify it. "It is unacceptable that people who yearn for democracy continues to conceal this problem for half of the company," she adds. For the CEO of Onfp, Habiba Ben Romdhane, the challenge is that the diagnosis of violence against women in Tunisia will allow us to develop an effective action plan and strategy to revitalise national fight against violence against women that has yet to be implemented.

Tags : AEIC, Antonio Perez Cosano, Cawtar, Guillermo Caro, Spanish Agency for international Development, Tunisia, Violence, Women
 
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Mona1

Guest
Domestic violence is not always only aimed at women. There is a good number of men who are also subjected to abuse. I would like to say abuse because I feel that some of what I have seen women doing to men, even if they are not hitting the men (which does also happen) is definitely abuse. I know of at least two Tunisian men who have been subjected to some disgusting domestic abuse by their British partners and by that I do not mean swearing at them.
 

Amber

oo la la ;)
Domestic violence is not always only aimed at women. There is a good number of men who are also subjected to abuse. I would like to say abuse because I feel that some of what I have seen women doing to men, even if they are not hitting the men (which does also happen) is definitely abuse. I know of at least two Tunisian men who have been subjected to some disgusting domestic abuse by their British partners and by that I do not mean swearing at them.
yes i agree domestic abuse is not reserved to women even if not so common ...same comment could apply to feminine pedophiles...
 
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Mona1

Guest
yes i agree domestic abuse is not reserved to women even if not so common ...same comment could apply to feminine pedophiles...
Absolutely, Amber, and this often gets forgotten. If the men were doing to the women, what the women were doing to them then we would be screaming for them to leave the man immediately. Paedophoiles, regardless of the sex are disgusting excuses for human beings.
 

Amber

oo la la ;)
Isn't that extremely high.....?

What is: economic violence?
yes figures , at least those published , are even undersetimating the realities , this article is absolutely faboulous , explains it very well ...
don't know either what they refer to when talking about economic violence, may be the fact that some men , on purpose , don't provide enough money to the family to survive and leave the women and kids starving for example ... i don't know ...
 
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NetNiet

Guest
yes figures , at least those published , are even undersetimating the realities , this article is absolutely faboulous , explains it very well ...
don't know either what they refer to when talking about economic violence, may be the fact that some men , on purpose , don't provide enough money to the family to survive and leave the women and kids starving for example ... i don't know ...
You say this article is absolutely faboulous while 78% of cases of economic violence are taking into it and you're not sure what it means.....?

There are some other things what I'm wondering, must be also the language problem, I know, but I will have a search to the original report.

The figures are alarming as 47.6 per cent of women aged 18 to 64 reported suffering at least one form of violence during their lifetime.
Is there a difference between violence and abuse? Is it for excample that if the violence happends more than X times, it's called abuse?
Because they state that 1 off the 5 women is abused, so that would be 20% and not 47.6%
 
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Mona1

Guest
Is there a difference between violence and abuse? Is it for excample that if the violence happends more than X times, it's called abuse?
Because they state that 1 off the 5 women is abused, so that would be 20% and not 47.6%
I would say that all violence is abuse but not abuse is violence. Abuse is a more generalised term and would emcompass emotional and mental abuse as well as physical violence.
 

Amber

oo la la ;)
You say this article is absolutely faboulous while 78% of cases of economic violence are taking into it and you're not sure what it means.....?

There are some other things what I'm wondering, must be also the language problem, I know, but I will have a search to the original report.


Is there a difference between violence and abuse? Is it for excample that if the violence happends more than X times, it's called abuse?
Because they state that 1 off the 5 women is abused, so that would be 20% and not 47.6%
yes , i will be glad to read the result of you search ...this article is faboulous to demonstrate the mechanisms ,same all over the world...beyond figures that are never reliable ...
abuse is insidious and so, much more difficult to fight ...
 
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Ariel

Guest
Economic abuse, I would hazard a guess is what we normally term 'financial abuse' in the UK. It mostly affects women who have no finances of their own (they may not be working and completely reliant upon the husband's wage). In a nutshell, it is where money is used as a method of control i.e. the witholding of money needed to buy food and other necessities for themselves and, often, children.
 
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