Hackers hit Tunisian government websites

alAzima

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http://english.aljazeera.net/news/africa/2011/01/201113111059792596.html

Hackers hit Tunisian websites
Amid anti-government protests, attack blocks access to stock exchange and ministry of foreign relations.

Evan Hill Last Modified: 03 Jan 2011 17:06 GMT


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Tunisian protesters planned a rare national strike for Monday as protests entered their 18th day [AFP]
Online activists have attacked and at least momentarily disabled several Tunisian government websites in the latest act of protest against the country's embattled leadership.
As of Monday afternoon, local time, at least eight websites had been affected, including those for the president, prime minister, ministry of industry, ministry of foreign affairs, and the stock exchange.
The attack, which began on Sunday night, coincided with a national strike, planned to take place on Monday, that organisers said would be the biggest popular event of its size since Zine El Abidine Ben Ali assumed the presidency.
The strike comes on the day that school students return from their holiday.
Ben Ali's administration has tightly restricted the flow of information out of Tunisia since widespread protests began on December 17, following 26-year-old Mohamed Bouazizi's suicide attempt. But reports of civil disobedience and police action filtered out on Twitter on Monday, with some users reporting the use of tear gas by security forces.
The loosely organised hacker group Anonymous claimed responsibility for the cyber attack, which it called "Operation Tunisia", an apparent arm of the group's broader effort - termed "Operation Payback" - aimed at taking retribution against governments and businesses viewed as hostile to the similarly amorphous document-leaking group WikiLeaks.
Operation Tunisia came just days after a similar attack on Zimbabwean government websites;in that case, Anonymous said that it had targeted Robert Mugabe's administration for actions taken by officials to suppress information about the thousands of secret US diplomatic cables that WikiLeaks has released.
But on Monday, Anonymous and its followers sought to tie their cyber attack to the ongoing protests and social unrest in Tunisia, not WikiLeaks. In a manifesto reportedly posted on the prime minister's website but later removed, the group said that it was "enraged" at the Tunisian government's behaviour, and that Ben Ali's administration had "unilaterally declared war on free speech, democracy, and even [its] own people".
"Anonymous is willing to help the Tunisian people in this fight against oppression," the statement said. "Cyber attacks will persist until the Tunisian government respects all Tunisian citizens' right to free speech and information and ceases the censoring of the internet".
Denial-of-service attack
Sami ben Gharbia, a Tunisian exile living in Europe who monitors online censorship in the country, told Al Jazeera that Monday's sabotage was the first time he had seen an international group like Anonymous target a Tunisian website.
Gharbia said he had witnessed the hackers planning the "denial-of-service" attack in a chat room arranged by Anonymous and that it appeared Tunisian users were among those participating.
The protests in Tunisia, which have led to three confirmed deaths, have garnered comparatively little attention in the Western media, which closely followed developments in 2009 in Iran when hundreds of thousands of citizens protested presidential election results.
Western governments have been similarly reticent about voicing criticism of Ben Ali's government, or its response to the protests. The country is a popular European tourist destination and has been praised by the World Bank for its financial policies.
But many within the country say the image of calm and success belies simmering resentments and unemployment rates that reach 25 per cent in certain areas.
High-level corruption
In private, the US has said that Tunisia's corruption - a contributor to the unemployment driving many to protest - is getting worse.
A 2008 diplomatic cable signed by Robert Godec, the US ambassador, and released by WikiLeaks in December describes both low- and high-level corruption in the country that scares away foreign and domestic investors.
"Whether it's cash, services, land, property, or yes, even your yacht, President Ben Ali's family is rumoured to covet it and reportedly gets what it wants," the cable states.
Gharbia said Monday's cyber attack probably will not affect protests "on the ground" but may serve as a "good story" to attract the mainstream media and embolden online activists in Tunisia.
"It might give a sense of solidarity to Tunisian bloggers who have been witnessing censorship for years now, to see such actions targeting the main body of the censorship," he said.
 

alAzima

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http://wlcentral.org/node/812

2011-01-03: Update: The Wrath of Anon in Tunisia

Submitted by knowledgeempire on Mon, 01/03/2011 - 09:20

If you thought the The Anonymous Group had hung their suits for the night, think again. The following is a list of additional Tunisian government and financial sites that have been rendered nonoperational; at the time of this publication, each is still down:


www.bmvt.com.tn - Tunisian Stock Exchange
www.sicad.gov.tn - Tunisian Foreign Relations
www.industrie.gov.tn - The Ministry of Industry
www.commerce.gov.tn - Tunisian Government Commerce
www.carthage.tn - The Carthage Palace: Presidency of The Republic of Tunisia
benali.tn - Presidential Elections Site
www.ministeres.tn - Tunisian government site listing various ministries
Expressed motivations for these attacks, as well as yesterday's DDoS attack updates, can be found here.
 

alAzima

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I wonder how long before Tunisia tries to blame the US for this one too like they blame the US for censorship of the Tunisian internet. Maybe they'll blame Julian Assange :tongue:
 

alAzima

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They are blaming a lot of this on Al Jazzera stating that al jazzera :

Meanwhile, the Tunisian parliament, along with four political parties, accused Al Jazeera of attempts "to destabilise the country, and to spread sedition via its coverage to Sidi Bouzaid incidents and the subsequent protests".
They have jointly issued statements released by the official Tunisian news agency, saying that Al Jazeera had "opted to exaggeration, fabrication and fallacy in its coverage of social protests over unemployment."
 

alAzima

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Letter from the hackers to the Tunisian authority :

http://www.zone-h.org/mirror/id/12845890

Payback is a bitch, isn't it?

(Subsidiary: Operation Tunisia)

AN OPEN LETTER TO THE GOVERNMENT OF TUNISIA
Greetings from Anonymous.
We have been watching your treatment of your own citizens, and we are both greatly saddened and enraged at your behavior. You have unilaterally declared war on free speech, democracy, and even your own people. Your citizens rally in the streets to demand accountability and their own rights, which you have wrongfully presumed it was in your purview to take from them.
We will use this brief span of attention we've captured to deliver a clear and present message which we hope shall never be forgot. Remember, remember, that the tighter you squeeze the more your citizens shall rebel against your rule. Like a fistful of sand in the palm of your grip, the more you squeeze your citizens the more that they will flow right out of your hand. The more you censor your own citizens the more they shall know about you and what you are doing.
A time for truth has come. A time for people to express themselves freely and to be heard from anywhere in the world. The Tunisian government wants to control the present with falsehoods and misinformation in order to impose a course for the future by keeping the truth hidden from its citizens. We will not remain silent while this happens. Anonymous has heard the cry for freedom from the Tunisian people. Anonymous is willing to help the Tunisian people in this fight against opression.
This is a warning to the Tunisian Government: violation of the freedom of speech and information of its citizens will not be tolerated. Cyber Attacks will persist until the Tunisian Government respects all Tunisian citizens right to Free Speech and Information and ceases the censoring of the internet.
It's in the hands of the Tunisian governement to stop this situation. Free the net and attacks will cease. Continue your oppression and this will just be the beginning.
We are Anonymous.
We are the angry avatar of free speech.
We are the immune system of democracy.
We do not forgive censorship.
We do not forget free speech.
Expect us - always.
 

Dreama

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They will find someone or some group to blame never themselves.
Im following Anonymous on Twitter now :ben:
 

mezoo

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they should close the internet completely in tunisia until this sh*t is under control. tunisian government websites are generally BS anyway. hacking them really does nothing but provide publicity for the idiots.:mad:
 

mezoo

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Keep us informed - I am not on Twitter.
i just made a twitter account. i haven't a clue what to do with it though. :huh: who the heck would follow me??? ha ha :tongue::huh:
 

Ben

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i just made a twitter account. i haven't a clue what to do with it though. :huh: who the heck would follow me??? ha ha :tongue::huh:
On the search box type #sidibouzid
or #tunisia
or #optunisia

you will get it from there :ben:
 

mezoo

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Expect us - always.
easy solve that. turn the internet completely off.
these idiots would never go to the streets. (or even join the military to protect their country is a guess i have)
they do this crap from easy chairs with drinks in hand.
it's funny though, i love what they are doing /did to mastercard and paypal so maybe they have a place eh???:D
 

scarlett rose

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Its time the world realised what goes on in Tunisia behind the fake smiles in hotels and Touristic areas its sickening!!
 

alAzima

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The group known as Anonymous has launched an attack against the TunisAir website. At present it seems that they've only messed with the main page and slowed it down, but I am not sure if further attacks are underway.
 

alAzima

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Some of this information came from wiki leaks cables, some from the French book about Mrs. Ben Ali :

El Materi, keen "to assist McDonald's to enter Tunisia", served a lavish dinner with ice cream and frozen yoghurt brought in by private plane from St Tropez, where he and his wife, Nesrine, one of the president's daughters, had just spent a two-week holiday (although their favourite destination is the Maldives). The El Materi household includes a large tiger, named Pasha, living in a cage, which consumes four chickens a day. The situation "reminded the US envoy of Uday Hussein's lion cage in Baghdad". The couple were planning to move to a new home "closer to a palace".
Godec concluded: "The opulence with which El Materi and Nesrine live and their behaviour make clear why they and other members of Ben Ali's family are disliked and even hated by some Tunisians. The excesses of the Ben Ali family are growing."

ine El Abidine Ben Ali sharmuta Leila Bent Mohamed Trebelsis.
The Trebelsis are anything but. These people are literally a rag-tag bunch of uneducated and lowly street thugs who found their way into power through the sharmuta prowess of First Lady Leila Ben Ali. She was mistress to the then married cheater Ben Ali back when he was prime minister and got pregnant and deceptively told Ben Ali that she was bearing a son (something the father of three daughters desperately wanted) and he summarily married her. Her family slowly began to accumulate power so much so that they now have monopolized the Tunisian economy through thuggery, intimidation, expropriation and outright theft and operate with such immunity that Tunisian now refer to them in mafia parlance as “the Family”. The mafia don is a BelHassen Trebelsi - a high school dropout. Its adverse effect on Tunisia’s economy as investors fear the growing hand of “the Family”
Whether it’s cash, services, land,
property, or yes, even your yacht, President Ben Ali’s family
is rumored to covet it and reportedly gets what it wants. With those at the top believed to be the worst offenders, and likely to remain in power, there are no checks in the system.
President Ben Ali’s extended family is often cited as
the nexus of Tunisian corruption. Often referred to as a
quasi-mafia, an oblique mention of “the Family” is enough to
indicate which family you mean. Ben Ali’s wife, Leila
Ben Ali, and her extended family — the Trabelsis — provoke
the greatest ire from Tunisians. Along with the numerous
allegations of Trabelsi corruption are often barbs about
their lack of education, low social status, and conspicuous
consumption. Leila’s brother Belhassen Trabelsi is the most
notorious family member and is rumored to have been involved
in a wide-range of corrupt schemes from the recent Banque de
Tunisie board shakeup (Ref B) to property expropriation and
extortion of bribes. Leaving the question of their
progenitor aside, Belhassen Trabelsi’s holdings are extensive
and include an airline, several hotels, one of Tunisia’s two
private radio stations, car assembly plants, Ford
distribution, a real estate development company, and the list
goes on.
Ben Ali has three
children with his first wife Naima Kefi: Ghaouna, Dorsaf and
Cyrine. They are married respectively to Slim Zarrouk, Slim
Chiboub, and Marouane Mabrouk — all significant economic
powers.
With real estate development booming and land
prices on the rise, owning property or land in the right
location can either be a windfall or a one-way ticket to
expropriation. In summer 2007, Leila Ben Ali received a
desirable tract of land in Carthage for free from the GOT in
order to build the for-profit Carthage International School. In addition to the land, the school received a 1.8
million dinar (US $1.5 million) gift from the GOT, and within
a matter of weeks the GOT had built new roads and stoplights
to facilitate school access. It has been reported that Ms.
Ben Ali has sold the Carthage International School to Belgian
investors. But the Belgian Embassy has as yet been unable to
confirm or discount the rumor. Leila asserted
that the school was indeed sold for a huge, but undisclosed sum.
Such sale would be pure profit since Ms. Ben Ali’s
received land, infrastructure, and a hefty bonus at no cost.

In 2006, Imed and Moaz Trabelsi, Ben Ali’s nephews,
are reported to have stolen the yacht of a well-connected
French businessman, Bruno Roger, Chairman of Lazard Paris.
The theft, widely reported in the French press, came to light
when the yacht, freshly painted to cover distinguishing
characteristics, appeared in the Sidi Bou Said harbor.
The stolen yacht
affair resurfaced in early 2008 due to an Interpol warrant
for the two Trabelsis.
 

Dreama

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Ive heard the hackers are now being hacked & their personal accounts are being deactivated, But its not stopping them they are now asking people from all over to join them in the hacking war.
 

Caramel

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The group known as Anonymous has launched an attack against the TunisAir website. At present it seems that they've only messed with the main page and slowed it down, but I am not sure if further attacks are underway.
I only hope their meddling does not cause any accidents with the planes. Would be very tragic.
 

alAzima

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Tunisair is down. I don't think it's going to affect air traffic as I highly doubt ( at least I really hope not) that anything is done through their website. But bookings and such are no longer available. They're trying to hit them in the pocket, I guess.
 

Ben

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Tunisair is down. I don't think it's going to affect air traffic as I highly doubt ( at least I really hope not) that anything is done through their website. But bookings and such are no longer available. They're trying to hit them in the pocket, I guess.
Tunisair is just few cents ... I don't think they really care much ... They control the food supply import (meat, wheat etc ..) that's what really will hurt them .. but unfortunately will hurt the common people too :( ... it's like a Cancer ... can't get rid of it without pain ( ... and chemotherapy :( )
 

alAzima

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They ought to hit some of those Trabelsi hotel sites :D
 
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