International Parental Child Abduction

G

Guess_Who

Guest
British Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) Home
International
parental child
abduction


Has your child been taken or kept
overseas by their other parent or a
relative without your permission?
Are you worried that this might
happen? This leaflet will tell you
what you can do and who to contact.
International parental
child abduction
1
What can I do if I am worried that my
child might be abducted overseas?
> If you are not sure about your legal position
in relation to your child, consider instructing
a suitably qualified family lawyer immediately.
You may need to get a residence (custody)
or preventative court order to stop your child
being taken out of the country. In England,
Wales and Northern Ireland, you may need
to apply to have your child made a ward of
court, through which the court becomes a
legal guardian of the child and can exercise
its powers to back up its decisions on what
is in that child’s best interests.
> Contact reunite. This is a charity organisation
which provides practical advice and
information to parents and families whose
children have been, or might be, abducted
overseas. They can send you a pack that tells
you how you can do your best to prevent
child abduction.
> Write to the Identity and Passport Service
(formerly known as the UK Passport Service),
enclosing a copy of a UK court order and
giving the expiry date, to ask them not to
grant a British passport to your child without
your permission. They can only do this in
certain circumstances – you will need to
contact them to find out when they can
do this.
2
> If the other parent of your child is not
British, they may be able to get a passport
for the child from their own Embassy, High
Commission or Consulate in this country.
In that case, you or your lawyer may wish
to write to the Embassy, High Commission
or Consulate of the other parent’s nationality
asking them not to issue a passport to
your child. They do not have to follow your
instructions, but they may do so voluntarily.
> Contact your local police station. If the police
are satisfied that the threat of abduction is
real and imminent (that is, you think your
child is likely to be taken overseas within 48
hours), they can contact the National Ports
Office and ask them to alert all UK points
of departure to try to prevent the abduction.
This is called a ‘Port Alert’.
What can I do if my child has been
abducted overseas?
> Report it to the local police immediately.
The parent who abducts the child may have
committed a criminal offence in the UK.
If it is not too late, the police may be able to
stop your child being taken out of the country.
If your child has been taken overseas but you
do not know exactly where, the police can
contact Interpol on your behalf. Interpol may
be able to work with overseas police forces to
help find the child.
> Contact reunite. This is a charity organisation
which provides practical advice and information
to parents and families whose children have
been, or might be, abducted overseas.
3
> Instruct a suitably qualified family lawyer in
the UK who can provide you with legal advice.
reunite has a list of lawyers who might be
able to help. Depending on which country
your child has been taken to, you may also
need to appoint a lawyer overseas.
> Contact the Child Abduction Section at the
Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) on
020 7008 0878 (or the FCO Response Centre
on 020 7008 1500 outside of office hours).
We can tell you whether the country that your
child has been taken to has joined the Hague
Convention on International Child Abduction
(see below), and provide information about
what you can do.
What is the Hague Convention?
The 1980 ‘Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects
of International Child Abduction’ is an agreement
between various countries which aims to ensure
the return of an abducted child to the country
where he or she normally lives, so that issues of
residence (custody) and contact (access) can be
decided by the courts of that country.
What happens if my child has been
taken to a country that has joined
the Hague Convention?
Contact the relevant UK Central Authority. There
are contact details at the end of this leaflet:
> In England and Wales, the Central Authority
is the International Child Abduction and
Contact Unit in the Ministry of Justice.
> In Scotland it is the Scottish Government.
> In Northern Ireland it is the Northern Ireland
Courts Service.
4
The UK Central Authority will handle your case.
They may be able to make an application on
your behalf under the Hague Convention to
the foreign Central Authority. The FCO will not
normally become involved in the case, unless the
UK Central Authorities ask for our help.
What happens if my child has been
taken to a country which has not
joined the Hague Convention?
If your child has been taken to a country that
has not joined the Hague Convention, there may
be no international systems in place to help you.
In these cases you can:
> try to come to an agreement with the
other parent
> start legal proceedings in the courts overseas.
If you cannot come to an agreement with the
other parent, you may need to apply to bring
your child back to the UK through the courts
overseas. The FCO cannot interfere in foreign
court proceedings and we cannot guarantee
that your child will be returned to you.
What can consular staff do to help
if your child has been abducted?
We and our consular staff overseas are
committed to giving British nationals all the
assistance we properly can.
5
We can:
> provide a list of overseas lawyers (see note
1 below) who speak English (some will be
specialists in family law)
> arrange for a welfare visit; if you have
contact details for your child and if the
other parent agrees;
> if you do not know where your child is,
we can contact the relevant authorities
overseas to check what progress has been
made in finding him/her
> offer travel information and help with finding
accommodation locally
> help you contact the relevant local authorities
and organisations when you are overseas
> where appropriate, contact the courts
overseas to express our interest in a case
and ask about progress
> in exceptional circumstances only, go to
court hearings overseas
> provide information about translation services
> where appropriate, issue travel documents.
Note 1:
Neither the Government nor the relevant British Embassy,
High Commission or Consulate can make any guarantee in
relation to the professional ability or character of any person
or company on the list, nor can they be held responsible in
any way for you relying on any advice you are given.
6
We cannot:
> ‘rescue’ a child or get involved in any
illegal attempts to bring a child back to
the UK
> locate your child if you do not know where
he/ she is
> offer legal advice or interfere in the legal
system of another country
> pay your bills, including legal, translations,
travel or accommodation.
Dual nationality
Dual nationality means being the national
of more than one country. A child may be
a dual national if they were born or lived
overseas or if one of his or her parents holds
the nationality of another country. If your child
has been taken to the country of their second
nationality, the authorities there may view your
child as a national of that country. This may
limit what we can do to help.
Taking the first step
Before you call anyone, be prepared to provide
the following information that can help others
to help you:
> Your child’s name, age, date of birth,
passport details and nationality.
> Details of the abducting parent and his or
her relatives, both in the UK and overseas.
> Details of any court orders giving you
residence or contact.
7
Useful addresses
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Child Abduction Section
Consular Directorate
Old Admiralty Building
London SW1A 2PA
Tel: 020 7008 0878
(or the FCO Response Centre on 020 7008 3350
outside of office hours)
Parental child abduction
Central Authority for England and Wales
The International Child Abduction
and Contact Unit
Ministry of Justice
81 Chancery Lane
London WC2A 1DD
Tel: 020 7911 7045 or 020 7911 7047
Offices of Court Funds, Official Solicitor and Public Trustee
Central Authority for Scotland
International & Human Rights Branch
St Andrews House
Regent Road
Edinburgh EH1 3DG
Tel: 0131 244 4827 or 0131 244 4826/7
Scottish Government: Web page currently unavailable.
Central Authority for Northern Ireland
Civil Policy Division
Northern Ireland Courts Service
3rd Floor
Windsor House
9-15 Bedford Street
Belfast BT2 7LT
Tel: 028 9041 2327/2380
Northern Ireland Court Service
8
Identity and Passport Service
Globe House
89 Ecceleston Square
London SWIV IPN
Tel: 0300 222 0000
(The passport advice line is open 24 hours
a day, seven days a week. Calls to this number
are charged at standard national rates.)
IPS - Homepage
reunite International Child Abduction Centre
PO Box 7124
Leicester LE1 7XX
Tel: 0116 2556 234 (advice line)
Reunite International
Missing People
NMPH HQ
Roebuck House
284 Upper Richmond Road West
London SW14 7JE
Tel: 0500 700 700 (freephone)
Missing People | Home

Consular Directorate
Foreign & Commonwealth Office
Old Admiralty Building
The Mall, London SW1A 2PA
Tel: 00 44 (O)20 7008 1500
Comments and Suggestions
We welcome the views of our customers
on the quality of the service we provide.
Please write to the Head of Consular
Directorate at the above address.
Parental child abduction
© Crown Copyright 2009
The contents of this publication are correct at
time of printing (March 2009).
Printed on recycled paper containing a minimum
of 75% post consumer waste and 25% ECF pulp.
The FCO work closely with Reunite and support
them in their work but they are an independent
organisation and we cannot be held responsible
in any way for you relying on their advice in
making any decisions about your case.
 
T

TunisiaMoon

Guest
British Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) Home
International
parental child
abduction


Has your child been taken or kept
overseas by their other parent or a
relative without your permission?
Are you worried that this might
happen? This leaflet will tell you
what you can do and who to contact.
International parental
child abduction
1
What can I do if I am worried that my
child might be abducted overseas?
> If you are not sure about your legal position
in relation to your child, consider instructing
a suitably qualified family lawyer immediately.
You may need to get a residence (custody)
or preventative court order to stop your child
being taken out of the country. In England,
Wales and Northern Ireland, you may need
to apply to have your child made a ward of
court, through which the court becomes a
legal guardian of the child and can exercise
its powers to back up its decisions on what
is in that child’s best interests.
> Contact reunite. This is a charity organisation
which provides practical advice and
information to parents and families whose
children have been, or might be, abducted
overseas. They can send you a pack that tells
you how you can do your best to prevent
child abduction.
> Write to the Identity and Passport Service
(formerly known as the UK Passport Service),
enclosing a copy of a UK court order and
giving the expiry date, to ask them not to
grant a British passport to your child without
your permission. They can only do this in
certain circumstances – you will need to
contact them to find out when they can
do this.
2
> If the other parent of your child is not
British, they may be able to get a passport
for the child from their own Embassy, High
Commission or Consulate in this country.
In that case, you or your lawyer may wish
to write to the Embassy, High Commission
or Consulate of the other parent’s nationality
asking them not to issue a passport to
your child. They do not have to follow your
instructions, but they may do so voluntarily.
> Contact your local police station. If the police
are satisfied that the threat of abduction is
real and imminent (that is, you think your
child is likely to be taken overseas within 48
hours), they can contact the National Ports
Office and ask them to alert all UK points
of departure to try to prevent the abduction.
This is called a ‘Port Alert’.
What can I do if my child has been
abducted overseas?
> Report it to the local police immediately.
The parent who abducts the child may have
committed a criminal offence in the UK.
If it is not too late, the police may be able to
stop your child being taken out of the country.
If your child has been taken overseas but you
do not know exactly where, the police can
contact Interpol on your behalf. Interpol may
be able to work with overseas police forces to
help find the child.
> Contact reunite. This is a charity organisation
which provides practical advice and information
to parents and families whose children have
been, or might be, abducted overseas.
3
> Instruct a suitably qualified family lawyer in
the UK who can provide you with legal advice.
reunite has a list of lawyers who might be
able to help. Depending on which country
your child has been taken to, you may also
need to appoint a lawyer overseas.
> Contact the Child Abduction Section at the
Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) on
020 7008 0878 (or the FCO Response Centre
on 020 7008 1500 outside of office hours).
We can tell you whether the country that your
child has been taken to has joined the Hague
Convention on International Child Abduction
(see below), and provide information about
what you can do.
What is the Hague Convention?
The 1980 ‘Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects
of International Child Abduction’ is an agreement
between various countries which aims to ensure
the return of an abducted child to the country
where he or she normally lives, so that issues of
residence (custody) and contact (access) can be
decided by the courts of that country.
What happens if my child has been
taken to a country that has joined
the Hague Convention?
Contact the relevant UK Central Authority. There
are contact details at the end of this leaflet:
> In England and Wales, the Central Authority
is the International Child Abduction and
Contact Unit in the Ministry of Justice.
> In Scotland it is the Scottish Government.
> In Northern Ireland it is the Northern Ireland
Courts Service.
4
The UK Central Authority will handle your case.
They may be able to make an application on
your behalf under the Hague Convention to
the foreign Central Authority. The FCO will not
normally become involved in the case, unless the
UK Central Authorities ask for our help.
What happens if my child has been
taken to a country which has not
joined the Hague Convention?
If your child has been taken to a country that
has not joined the Hague Convention, there may
be no international systems in place to help you.
In these cases you can:
> try to come to an agreement with the
other parent
> start legal proceedings in the courts overseas.
If you cannot come to an agreement with the
other parent, you may need to apply to bring
your child back to the UK through the courts
overseas. The FCO cannot interfere in foreign
court proceedings and we cannot guarantee
that your child will be returned to you.
What can consular staff do to help
if your child has been abducted?
We and our consular staff overseas are
committed to giving British nationals all the
assistance we properly can.
5
We can:
> provide a list of overseas lawyers (see note
1 below) who speak English (some will be
specialists in family law)
> arrange for a welfare visit; if you have
contact details for your child and if the
other parent agrees;
> if you do not know where your child is,
we can contact the relevant authorities
overseas to check what progress has been
made in finding him/her
> offer travel information and help with finding
accommodation locally
> help you contact the relevant local authorities
and organisations when you are overseas
> where appropriate, contact the courts
overseas to express our interest in a case
and ask about progress
> in exceptional circumstances only, go to
court hearings overseas
> provide information about translation services
> where appropriate, issue travel documents.
Note 1:
Neither the Government nor the relevant British Embassy,
High Commission or Consulate can make any guarantee in
relation to the professional ability or character of any person
or company on the list, nor can they be held responsible in
any way for you relying on any advice you are given.
6
We cannot:
> ‘rescue’ a child or get involved in any
illegal attempts to bring a child back to
the UK
> locate your child if you do not know where
he/ she is
> offer legal advice or interfere in the legal
system of another country
> pay your bills, including legal, translations,
travel or accommodation.
Dual nationality
Dual nationality means being the national
of more than one country. A child may be
a dual national if they were born or lived
overseas or if one of his or her parents holds
the nationality of another country. If your child
has been taken to the country of their second
nationality, the authorities there may view your
child as a national of that country. This may
limit what we can do to help.
Taking the first step
Before you call anyone, be prepared to provide
the following information that can help others
to help you:
> Your child’s name, age, date of birth,
passport details and nationality.
> Details of the abducting parent and his or
her relatives, both in the UK and overseas.
> Details of any court orders giving you
residence or contact.
7
Useful addresses
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Child Abduction Section
Consular Directorate
Old Admiralty Building
London SW1A 2PA
Tel: 020 7008 0878
(or the FCO Response Centre on 020 7008 3350
outside of office hours)
Parental child abduction
Central Authority for England and Wales
The International Child Abduction
and Contact Unit
Ministry of Justice
81 Chancery Lane
London WC2A 1DD
Tel: 020 7911 7045 or 020 7911 7047
Offices of Court Funds, Official Solicitor and Public Trustee
Central Authority for Scotland
International & Human Rights Branch
St Andrews House
Regent Road
Edinburgh EH1 3DG
Tel: 0131 244 4827 or 0131 244 4826/7
Scottish Government: Web page currently unavailable.
Central Authority for Northern Ireland
Civil Policy Division
Northern Ireland Courts Service
3rd Floor
Windsor House
9-15 Bedford Street
Belfast BT2 7LT
Tel: 028 9041 2327/2380
Northern Ireland Court Service
8
Identity and Passport Service
Globe House
89 Ecceleston Square
London SWIV IPN
Tel: 0300 222 0000
(The passport advice line is open 24 hours
a day, seven days a week. Calls to this number
are charged at standard national rates.)
IPS - Homepage
reunite International Child Abduction Centre
PO Box 7124
Leicester LE1 7XX
Tel: 0116 2556 234 (advice line)
Reunite International
Missing People
NMPH HQ
Roebuck House
284 Upper Richmond Road West
London SW14 7JE
Tel: 0500 700 700 (freephone)
Missing People | Home

Consular Directorate
Foreign & Commonwealth Office
Old Admiralty Building
The Mall, London SW1A 2PA
Tel: 00 44 (O)20 7008 1500
Comments and Suggestions
We welcome the views of our customers
on the quality of the service we provide.
Please write to the Head of Consular
Directorate at the above address.
Parental child abduction
© Crown Copyright 2009
The contents of this publication are correct at
time of printing (March 2009).
Printed on recycled paper containing a minimum
of 75% post consumer waste and 25% ECF pulp.
The FCO work closely with Reunite and support
them in their work but they are an independent
organisation and we cannot be held responsible
in any way for you relying on their advice in
making any decisions about your case.
Great information there missis. Thanks :D
 

Etoyoc

Major Ratslayer
As far as it concerns Tunisia:

1) Tunisia has not signed the "Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects
of International Child Abduction"

and

2) All children of a tunisian father obtain automatically by birth the tunisian citizenship and will be regarded in Tunisia as having ONLY the tunisian citizenship.
 
T

tunisblue

Guest
As far as it concerns Tunisia:

1) Tunisia has not signed the "Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects
of International Child Abduction"

and

2) All children of a tunisian father obtain automatically by birth the tunisian citizenship and will be regarded in Tunisia as having ONLY the tunisian citizenship.
anyone know what i need to obtain US birth cert in Tunisia? i am so confused on giving birth here. i have heard so many different things! and what if i do not make it to the clinic? what than??? huh??? lol honestly i am a little freaked out.
 

Tunisianbelle

'Don't call me Darling!' Mod
anyone know what i need to obtain US birth cert in Tunisia?
You need to make an appointment with the US Embassy. You have to take the birth certificate from the clinic, fill out a form, show your passport, and evidence that you meet the legal requirements to pass on US Citizenship to your child. You also have to pay a fee. I always got the passports and the CRBA (Consular Report of a Birth Abroad) at the same time as well.

If you have questions, you should call the US Embassy 71.107.000 or visit their website: Embassy of the United States Tunis, Tunisia - Home
 

Tunisianbelle

'Don't call me Darling!' Mod
and what if i do not make it to the clinic? what than??? huh??? lol honestly i am a little freaked out.
I have no advice for this, but I can tell you that if you are going to a clinic in Sousse, I recommend Les Oliviers (Zayatine). Do NOT go to clinic Esselem - I gave birth there to O and it was a terrible experience. I have heard others say bad things about that clinic as well.
 

paula01

Senior Rat Expert
I have no advice for this, but I can tell you that if you are going to a clinic in Sousse, I recommend Les Oliviers (Zayatine). Do NOT go to clinic Esselem - I gave birth there to O and it was a terrible experience. I have heard others say bad things about that clinic as well.
My daughter was in Les Oliviers, and they were really good. I stayed with her for a week and couldnt fault it.
 
G

GaileIrene

Guest
what if i do not make it to the clinic? what than??? huh??? lol honestly i am a little freaked out.
If this is your first pregnancy, you will likely have more than plenty of time.
If it's a second or later - that's another story!
 
G

Guess_Who

Guest
TUNISIA

Overview

The Tunisian legal system is heavily influenced by French civil law but the
Law of Personal Status is based on Islamic Law and Article 1 of the 1959
Constitution declares that Islam is the State religion. The dominant school
of Islamic jurisprudence in Tunisia is Maliki, with some input from the
Hanafi School as a result of Ottoman influence in the region. The Tunisian
Law of Personal Status was promulgated in 1956 and has been amended by
laws 59-77 of 19th June 1959, 64-1 of 21 April 1964, 81-7 18th February
1981 and 93-74 of 12th July 1993. Among these amendments were articles
increasing the parental authority of the mother. Tunisia has gone further than
many Middle Eastern countries in the reform of its personal status law. It
bans polygamy and extra-judicial divorce and does not automatically give
guardianship of children to the father when they reach a certain age.

Foreign Orders

Foreign court orders can be considered in a Tunisian court but they are only
enforceable if they are not in conflict with Tunisian Law.

Court Structure

There are no separate courts for the application of family law. Sharia courts
were abolished in 1956.
The court system in Tunisia can be divided into four levels. At the first level
is the District Court, which has a limited criminal jurisdiction and hears
minor matters such as nationality and labour issues. At the next level the
Court of First Instance (al mahkama al ibtida’iya) has chambers for civil,
commercial, criminal and personal status matters. It hears appeals from the
District Courts and each case is presided over by three judges. The Appeal
Court (al mahkama al isti’nafiya) forms the next level. There are three
regional courts in Sousse, Sfax and Tunis. These courts have jurisdiction to
hear appeals from the Court of First Instance. At the fourth level is the
Supreme Court. This court hears appeals from the Courts of Appeal and First
Instance and will only review a case if a breach of the law is the basis for the
appeal.

Filiation

Paternity is established by co-habitation, the confirmation of the father or the
testimony of two or more trusted witnesses. Whether or not the marriage
contract is valid, a chid born at least six months after the conclusion of a
marriage is considered to be the child of the husband. However, Article 69
of the Law of Personal Status reads that the paternity of a child born to a
married woman is not established if it is proved that her husband is not cohabiting
with her, or if the child was born more than one year after the
absence or death of the husband or a year after a divorce. The legal
guardian of a child born outside of a marital relationship is the parent who
recognises the child, whether it is the father, the mother or both.
Adoption is permitted in Tunisia.

Custody

According to Article 57 of the Law of Personal Status, while the marriage
subsists the mother and father have equal responsibility for the custodianship
of the child. However, Article 154 reads that the father is the automatic
guardian of a minor child. If a marriage ends in the death of one of the
partners, the surviving parent will be awarded custody. In the event of
divorce custody may be awarded to one of the parents or a third party. The
Tunisian Code does not specify set ages as limits for custody of the mother.
All custody cases are decided by the court in the best interests of the child
(Article 67). Article 4 of the Child Protection Act states that in considering
the best interests of the child the moral, physical and emotional needs of the
child, the child’s age and state of health and family environment must all be
taken into consideration.
According to Article 58 of the Law of Personal Status the person awarded
custody must be an adult of sound mind who is trustworthy, able to provide
for the welfare of the child and is free from contagious diseases. It also
stipulates that if custody is awarded to a man he must show that there is a
woman who will be able to help carry out the responsibilities of the custody.
He must also be a relation within the prohibited degree of a female child in
his custody. A female custodian must not be married except where it is
judged by the court to be in the best interest of the child to award custody to
a married woman or if the husband is within the prohibited degree of
relationship to the child.
Article 59 states that if the custodian has a different religion to the father of
the child their custodianship lasts only until the child reaches the age of 5
and as long as there is no risk that the child would be raised in another
religion. However, this does not apply if the custodian is the mother.

Guardianship

If custody is awarded to the mother she enjoys the prerogatives of
guardianship as regards travel, schooling and management of finances.
Although Article 154 establishes the father’s automatic right to
guardianship, a judge can confer the full authority of guardianship upon the
mother along with custodianship if the father is deceased or if he is unable to
exercise his duties. Article 67 places further conditions upon the guardian so
that if he abandons his permanent place of residence or if he acts in any way
that might put the welfare of the child at risk, his right to guardianship will
be lost. Article 60 gives the mother an equal right to supervise the child’s
affairs and she, along with the guardian, must give consent for a minor child
to marry (Article 6).
The period of guardianship lasts until the age of 20. However, a female can
marry at 17 and doing so accords her legal majority in personal status, civil
and commercial matters.

Access

Article 11 of the Child Protection Act and Article 66 of the Law of Personal
Status give both parents the right of access to their child. The child is not
permitted to spend the night away from the residence of the person with
custody, unless the court gives permission being satisfied that it is in the
interests of the child (Article 60). According to Article 61 if the custodian
changes the place of residence and moves to such a distance that the
guardian is unable fulfil the duties of guardianship, the custodian will lose
the right to custody of the child. A foreign mother who is awarded custody
can seek a court order allowing her to exercise custody outside of Tunisia.
This permission is not usually granted except where the parents agree.
Article 62 states that when the mother has custody, the father cannot remove a child except with her permission or if the child is at risk if he or she is not removed.

Non-Muslim Family Law

The Tunisian Law of Personal Status is applied to all Tunisians regardless of
their religion.

Nationality

Nationality is determined by the Tunisian Nationality Code. Article 6 of this
code states that Tunisian nationality is acquired by a child born to a Tunisian
father, or to a Tunisian mother if the father is unknown or has no nationality.
A child born in Tunisia to a Tunisian mother may also be entitled to
Tunisian nationality even if the father is of foreign nationality.

Leaving the Jurisdiction

Tunisians under the age of 20, the age of majority, cannot travel outside of
Tunisia without the permission of the father, a Tunisian mother or the court.
To renew or obtain a passport permission of the father is needed.

International Law

Tunisia has signed bilateral agreements with France in 1982 (Convention
between the Government of the French Republic and the Government of the
Tunisian Republic on judicial co-operation in matters of custody, access and
maintenance) and Belgium in 1989 (The Agreement Protocol establishing a
Belgian-Tunisian consultative committee on civil matters). According to
the paragraph 303 of the Tunisian report submitted to the Committee on the
Rights of the Child in 2001, approximately one third of the cases submitted
to the committees set up by the bilateral agreements had been resolved
amicably. The cases were resolved through a court decision to return the
child or by the exequator of a foreign judge. Reasons stated for the
unsuccessful resolution of cases are the rejection by the court of the
application of return or exequator for reasons of public order or the child’s
best interests, or because the child had reached the age of discretion and had expressed a desire to remain in Tunisia and not to return to the left behind parent.

Tunisia has also signed the Convention on the Rights of the Child and it was
ratified in 1992. Tunisia has reservations regarding Articles 2, 6, 7 and 40
(2) (b) (v).

Contacts

Ministry of Justice and Human Rights
31 Avenue Bab Benat
1006 Tunis
Tel : +216 1 71 561 440
Email: [email protected]
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Avenue de la Ligue des Etats arabes
Tel: +216 1 71 847 500/ 71 785 074/ 71 785 025
Email: [email protected]
 
T

tunisblue

Guest
I have no advice for this, but I can tell you that if you are going to a clinic in Sousse, I recommend Les Oliviers (Zayatine). Do NOT go to clinic Esselem - I gave birth there to O and it was a terrible experience. I have heard others say bad things about that clinic as well.
thanks t belle. as you may very well tell i am still freaking out a little about the whole thing! my ob here told me to go to esselem as it is closer. thanks fr adding to my freak outs! :tongue: next post will be about the clinics! lol i am also confused on the cost to give birth here? i have been told 500$ to 2000$!!! crazy..
 
T

tunisblue

Guest
If this is your first pregnancy, you will likely have more than plenty of time.
If it's a second or later - that's another story!
Gaile, this is mashAllah number 5! i have a history, I'd like to repeat(mashAllah inshaAllah) of making it in the nick of time. i labor at home for a few days and only go when in so much pain i cant breath. but at home my hospital is like 5 minutes away, here its 25!
 
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Guess_Who

Guest
Police will unveil a new nationwide alert system for enlisting the public to help them rescue abducted children next month.

The network, comparable to the amber alert system in the United States, will be compatible with other European countries for the first time.

As a result a continent-wide alert could be issued in circumstances where youngsters may be taken across national borders.

Kate and Gerry McCann have campaigned for such a system to be introduced since their daughter Madeleine disappeared in Portugal in May 2007.

Although some 100,000 children are reported missing to police each year, senior officers expect the national alert to be used extremely rarely.

Regional and national television and radio stations will broadcast messages, in some cases interrupting scheduled programmes.

Those behind the system hope to eventually use internet and text messaging as well as motorway information signs.

The system is being co-ordinated by the National Police Improvement Agency (NPIA) and any national abduction investigation will be led by Greater Manchester Police.

Chief Constable Peter Neyroud, who heads the NPIA, said the new alert will be launched on May 25, International Missing Children's Day.

He said: "Child Rescue Alert is a powerful tool in the fight against child abduction in the UK.

"By establishing a powerful partnership between the police, media and the public, Child Rescue Alert allows information about the child and the suspect to be shared in just a few hours of a disappearance when the criteria for such an alert are met.

"These are often the vital hours which could literally mean the difference between life and death."

Work on the improved system began after the NPIA won a share of one million euros (£886,000) from the European Commission alongside France, Holland and Belgium.

Portugal, Spain and the Czech Republic have already introduced their versions of child abduction alerts that link with the European network.

The previous national alert system was established in 2006 and has only been used on a handful of occasions.

They included an incident when a six-year-old girl was found under a bed after being missed in a search and a child left strapped into a car stolen by thieves.

:mad: ABOUT BLOODY TIME!!!
 
A

ABP World Group

Guest
ABP International Child Recovery Service​
The goal of ABP World Group international child recovery services is to locate, negotiate and recover your missing child.
We can dispatch personnel to most locations in the world; we specialize in locating missing children up to ages 18.
Areas of expertise: Parental abduction, Missing children, Kidnappings,
Runaway children and Counselling.​
Unfortunately in this day and time parental kidnapping happens and we are here to help you trough this difficult period.
We are aware parental child abduction can be difficult to resolve, but we use professional operatives with the skills and expertise to help find a resolution.
One key to Abp World Group`s successful recovery and re-unification of your loved one is to use all necessary means available

www.abpworld.com
 
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