The yardstick : How would a Tunisian man conduct a relationship with a Tunisian woman?

Mango Chutney

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No this is false info mystery.
Even if you lived there 20 years he cant get a visa on that merit.
You would still have to come back to the uk alone and earn the requirment then apply for him to come.
Thank God for that!!! :eek:

Can't imagine any woman would cope living there with a rat for four years anyway.....t'was a miracle I survived as long as I did :thumbsup:
 

Heidi

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asslema fm
According to an official report, the percentage of unmarried females in the age of fertilization is half of the population, according to the census of the population that the number of women in Tunisia was more than one million and 300 thousand women out of the four million and 900 thousand females in the country.
These statistics reveal a social problem that will have negative repercussions on the Tunisian society in the coming decades, considering that the lack of childbearing will lead to population fragmentation, the size of the old and old in Tunisia, and the diminishing capacities of young people.
On the other hand, the results of the third youth consultation, which dealt with the relationship of youth to the institution of marriage, confirmed that 50 percent of them do not think about marriage.
This reluctance is attributed to the fundamental problem of rising marriage costs. The celebration of marriage in Tunisia has become a project that requires major financial preparations to ensure its success.
Since the young man begins to think about the engagement of his dream girl and his future partner, he encounters many difficulties and problems. The first is to provide the price of engagement ring in light of the high price of gold.
In addition to the need to provide the requirements of engagement sweets and roses and others. The cost goes up if the girl thinks of going to the barber, buying a wedding dress and having a wedding party in a wedding hall.
Which contributed to the increase in the total costs of the engagement party to lay between 5 and 6 thousand dinars. And be doubling in marriage.
In a simple calculation based on the moderate price, the cost of marriage in Tunisia is almost 60,000 Tunisian dinars if we calculate that the groom is obliged to buy:
Gold is about 5000 dinars
The sweets are about 3000 dinars
Wedding Hall 5000 dinars
Shaving 1000 dinars
Dinner is about 8000 dinars
The bride is about 9000 dinars
Rent the house and equipped with furniture 12000 dinars

33987287_449469812167936_379471862524018688_n.jpg

http://www.asslemafm.net/2019/02/mariagetunisie5028022019.html?fbclid=IwAR2evd4ZnO9tqvQ5N_D7a6f-xuGGi_o8myBMjDcJM3Uc5-PL0JjvRxsUw3k
 

AmberHeart

Lady Amberheart of Gafsa
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asslema fm
According to an official report, the percentage of unmarried females in the age of fertilization is half of the population, according to the census of the population that the number of women in Tunisia was more than one million and 300 thousand women out of the four million and 900 thousand females in the country.
These statistics reveal a social problem that will have negative repercussions on the Tunisian society in the coming decades, considering that the lack of childbearing will lead to population fragmentation, the size of the old and old in Tunisia, and the diminishing capacities of young people.
On the other hand, the results of the third youth consultation, which dealt with the relationship of youth to the institution of marriage, confirmed that 50 percent of them do not think about marriage.
This reluctance is attributed to the fundamental problem of rising marriage costs. The celebration of marriage in Tunisia has become a project that requires major financial preparations to ensure its success.
Since the young man begins to think about the engagement of his dream girl and his future partner, he encounters many difficulties and problems. The first is to provide the price of engagement ring in light of the high price of gold.
In addition to the need to provide the requirements of engagement sweets and roses and others. The cost goes up if the girl thinks of going to the barber, buying a wedding dress and having a wedding party in a wedding hall.
Which contributed to the increase in the total costs of the engagement party to lay between 5 and 6 thousand dinars. And be doubling in marriage.
In a simple calculation based on the moderate price, the cost of marriage in Tunisia is almost 60,000 Tunisian dinars if we calculate that the groom is obliged to buy:
Gold is about 5000 dinars
The sweets are about 3000 dinars
Wedding Hall 5000 dinars
Shaving 1000 dinars
Dinner is about 8000 dinars
The bride is about 9000 dinars
Rent the house and equipped with furniture 12000 dinars

View attachment 53750

http://www.asslemafm.net/2019/02/mariagetunisie5028022019.html?fbclid=IwAR2evd4ZnO9tqvQ5N_D7a6f-xuGGi_o8myBMjDcJM3Uc5-PL0JjvRxsUw3k
all this circus to end married to an online scammer who has many women all over the world and shares his dik with all toruist he can...nice marriage. he respects her so much uh.
 

Heidi

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Last edited:

Mango Chutney

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According to an official report, the percentage of unmarried females in the age of fertilization is half of the population
50 percent of them do not think about marriage.
Sensible girls :thumbsup:
No need to bring this back then:


TUNISIAN & EGYPTIAN ACTIVISTS CALL FOR POLYGAMY TO SOLVE ‘SPINSTER CRISIS’
4 minute read.
By TERRANCE J. MINTNER/THE MEDIA LINE

A Tunisian woman holds up a flag during a march to celebrate International Women's Day in Tunis March 8, 2014. (photo credit: ZOUBEIR SOUISSI / REUTERS)
"If some people condemn polygynous marriages it is because of imperialist and colonialist attitudes toward Muslim women"- Svetlana Peshkova, associate professor at the University of New Hampshire.
Debates surrounding polygamy have surfaced in Egypt and Tunisia in recent weeks as a remedy for the perceived dilemma of unmarried women that have surpassed the perceived usual age for wedlock. Pro-polygamy activists in both countries have claimed that the number of such women desiring marriage is already high and growing rapidly.

Polygamy is the umbrella term for the practice of marrying multiple spouses. Polygyny, which refers to a man married to more than one wife at a time, is the more precise sociological term for the phenomenon in question.

Last month, a group of Tunisian women reportedly took to social media to organize a pro-polygamy protest. The practice is outlawed in the North African nation and is widely considered taboo. Nevertheless, the group aims to amend the law by staging demonstrations outside government buildings.


According to a recent report by Tunisia’s National Office for Family and Population, the country has one of the highest number of single women in the Arab world. It revealed that as of last year their numbers increased to more than 2.25 million out of a total of 4.9 million females in the country.


Meanwhile in Egypt a similar social dynamic has sparked calls for increased polygamy. The Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI) reported that a debate on the matter recently took place on television with one sympathizer, Saber Ghanem, saying it
“is permitted under Shari’a [Islamic law]" and would address "a ticking time bomb in our society: 11 million [single] women who have surpassed the age of marriage.”

Ghanem argued that every human, including these women—wives, divorced women and widows—has “natural” and “sexual needs” which need to be satisfied and that polygamy adequately addresses this problem. “Another advantage of polygamy,” he added, “is that it strengthens the bonds between tribes, families and countries.”




Egypt allows the practice but restricts a Muslim man from marrying more than four wives. The husband must also gain the consent of his current wife or wives if hopes to take on more.


Dr. Janet Bennion, Professor of sociocultural anthropology at Northern Vermont University and an expert on polygamy, told The Media Line that the practice “is a viable alternative to a variety of alienating conditions, especially in patriarchal environments that do not always allow women the same rights and access to political and economic promotion.”


Women who are single, under such conditions, are often left destitute and without an economic and domestic network, she explained. Divorced, widowed and abandoned women also seek a supportive framework.


“It is not unlikely then that women are opting for polygamy in cases in which they can share the duties of childhood and career with other like-minded women. This same condition is seen in inner black U.S. cities such as Detroit or Chicago where Muslim women are seeking ‘good’ men who are already attached to another woman in order to live as mothers and workers, tapping into the female network established through plural marriage.”


Svetlana Peshkova, Associate Professor of Anthropology and an expert on Muslim societies at the University of New Hampshire, expressed skepticism about the high number of single women that pro-polygamy activists cite in Egypt and Tunisia.


“Nevertheless, the idea that Tunisian women would opt for polygynous marriages is not unusual considering the country’s economic state of affairs. People are trying to make ends meet and would like to have more financial security. If the state fails to provide this—for mothers particularly—more women will opt for such unions,” Peshkova told The Media Line.


“If some people condemn polygynous marriages it is because of imperialist and colonialist attitudes toward Muslim women who have for a long time been considered unable to articulate their own desires. If indeed they desire to enter into such marriages this should be up to them and articulated on their own terms.”


In other parts of the world there are plenty of social, familial and sexual relationships that are not legalized but are common in places like Europe and Russia, she explained. For example, it is not unusual for men to have mistresses in addition to a long-term partner.


“The problem in these cases is that these women are not legally protected. They cannot get benefits from common law which views them as non-legal partners and they do not receive social recognition. So, it is not completely unfathomable that women in these situations would want to be socially and legally recognized as wives and not just mistresses for an individual,” Peshkova concluded.


Radhia Jerbi, Director of the National Union of Tunisian Women, told The Media Line that there were calls for polygamy on social media but protests over the issue have not materialized. “As of yet, nothing has happened,” she said.


“Nevertheless, because of economic problems, I am not sure that Tunisian men can afford to maintain multiple wives. It would also not be easy to bring back polygamy for economic as well as social reasons as most Tunisians cannot accept it. They do not want to be like other Arab nations that do.”


Furthermore, on the political front, the laws prohibiting the practice are grouped under the Personal Status Code which is part and parcel of the Tunisian Constitution, Jerbi explained. It is therefore not easy to alter it, and any such amendments cannot be made merely via protest.


“The issue indicates a lack of awareness by those who are demanding polygamy,” she concluded. “This will not affect the lifestyle of Tunisian society or the achievements of Tunisian women.”

https://m.jpost.com/Middle-East/Tunisian-and-Egyptian-Activists-Call-For-Polygamy-To-Solve-Spinster-Crisis-581515

Of course, there would be more men to share between the Tunisian women....if they stopped pimping the prostitutes out to anything Western :thumbsup:
The bride is about 9000 dinars
Gonna show my fella this......see how much he'd have paid to buy me :D
 

Brasilgirl

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Joined
Feb 28, 2018
Messages
2,623
Sensible girls :thumbsup:
No need to bring this back then:


TUNISIAN & EGYPTIAN ACTIVISTS CALL FOR POLYGAMY TO SOLVE ‘SPINSTER CRISIS’
4 minute read.
By TERRANCE J. MINTNER/THE MEDIA LINE

A Tunisian woman holds up a flag during a march to celebrate International Women's Day in Tunis March 8, 2014. (photo credit: ZOUBEIR SOUISSI / REUTERS)
"If some people condemn polygynous marriages it is because of imperialist and colonialist attitudes toward Muslim women"- Svetlana Peshkova, associate professor at the University of New Hampshire.
Debates surrounding polygamy have surfaced in Egypt and Tunisia in recent weeks as a remedy for the perceived dilemma of unmarried women that have surpassed the perceived usual age for wedlock. Pro-polygamy activists in both countries have claimed that the number of such women desiring marriage is already high and growing rapidly.

Polygamy is the umbrella term for the practice of marrying multiple spouses. Polygyny, which refers to a man married to more than one wife at a time, is the more precise sociological term for the phenomenon in question.

Last month, a group of Tunisian women reportedly took to social media to organize a pro-polygamy protest. The practice is outlawed in the North African nation and is widely considered taboo. Nevertheless, the group aims to amend the law by staging demonstrations outside government buildings.


According to a recent report by Tunisia’s National Office for Family and Population, the country has one of the highest number of single women in the Arab world. It revealed that as of last year their numbers increased to more than 2.25 million out of a total of 4.9 million females in the country.


Meanwhile in Egypt a similar social dynamic has sparked calls for increased polygamy. The Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI) reported that a debate on the matter recently took place on television with one sympathizer, Saber Ghanem, saying it
“is permitted under Shari’a [Islamic law]" and would address "a ticking time bomb in our society: 11 million [single] women who have surpassed the age of marriage.”

Ghanem argued that every human, including these women—wives, divorced women and widows—has “natural” and “sexual needs” which need to be satisfied and that polygamy adequately addresses this problem. “Another advantage of polygamy,” he added, “is that it strengthens the bonds between tribes, families and countries.”




Egypt allows the practice but restricts a Muslim man from marrying more than four wives. The husband must also gain the consent of his current wife or wives if hopes to take on more.


Dr. Janet Bennion, Professor of sociocultural anthropology at Northern Vermont University and an expert on polygamy, told The Media Line that the practice “is a viable alternative to a variety of alienating conditions, especially in patriarchal environments that do not always allow women the same rights and access to political and economic promotion.”


Women who are single, under such conditions, are often left destitute and without an economic and domestic network, she explained. Divorced, widowed and abandoned women also seek a supportive framework.


“It is not unlikely then that women are opting for polygamy in cases in which they can share the duties of childhood and career with other like-minded women. This same condition is seen in inner black U.S. cities such as Detroit or Chicago where Muslim women are seeking ‘good’ men who are already attached to another woman in order to live as mothers and workers, tapping into the female network established through plural marriage.”


Svetlana Peshkova, Associate Professor of Anthropology and an expert on Muslim societies at the University of New Hampshire, expressed skepticism about the high number of single women that pro-polygamy activists cite in Egypt and Tunisia.


“Nevertheless, the idea that Tunisian women would opt for polygynous marriages is not unusual considering the country’s economic state of affairs. People are trying to make ends meet and would like to have more financial security. If the state fails to provide this—for mothers particularly—more women will opt for such unions,” Peshkova told The Media Line.


“If some people condemn polygynous marriages it is because of imperialist and colonialist attitudes toward Muslim women who have for a long time been considered unable to articulate their own desires. If indeed they desire to enter into such marriages this should be up to them and articulated on their own terms.”


In other parts of the world there are plenty of social, familial and sexual relationships that are not legalized but are common in places like Europe and Russia, she explained. For example, it is not unusual for men to have mistresses in addition to a long-term partner.


“The problem in these cases is that these women are not legally protected. They cannot get benefits from common law which views them as non-legal partners and they do not receive social recognition. So, it is not completely unfathomable that women in these situations would want to be socially and legally recognized as wives and not just mistresses for an individual,” Peshkova concluded.


Radhia Jerbi, Director of the National Union of Tunisian Women, told The Media Line that there were calls for polygamy on social media but protests over the issue have not materialized. “As of yet, nothing has happened,” she said.


“Nevertheless, because of economic problems, I am not sure that Tunisian men can afford to maintain multiple wives. It would also not be easy to bring back polygamy for economic as well as social reasons as most Tunisians cannot accept it. They do not want to be like other Arab nations that do.”


Furthermore, on the political front, the laws prohibiting the practice are grouped under the Personal Status Code which is part and parcel of the Tunisian Constitution, Jerbi explained. It is therefore not easy to alter it, and any such amendments cannot be made merely via protest.


“The issue indicates a lack of awareness by those who are demanding polygamy,” she concluded. “This will not affect the lifestyle of Tunisian society or the achievements of Tunisian women.”

https://m.jpost.com/Middle-East/Tunisian-and-Egyptian-Activists-Call-For-Polygamy-To-Solve-Spinster-Crisis-581515

Of course, there would be more men to share between the Tunisian women....if they stopped pimping the prostitutes out to anything Western :thumbsup:

Gonna show my fella this......see how much he'd have paid to buy me :D
The rats are going to have to scam twice as hard if they want a second wife to brag about. They can barely get enough for one bride, if that. And to sustain a family with three adults and ten kids? Definatly only for the wealthy.
 

Going for the limit

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This is one of the most ridiculous things ever.
I was a member on 1 group where there was loads of them in this type of marriage.
The jealousy between them was hideous considering they knew what they were signing up for but if you tried to question them as to why they agreed to it then you would be shot right down.
 

Going for the limit

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Messages
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I can still recall some comments now. "I am so depressed wife no 3 has had more attention than me, my husband has spent 1 extra day with her when it was my day.
I have had a meeting with wife number 2 and we both agree that wife no 3 is demanding too much attention ."
And it went on and on that shit is unreal
 

Heidi

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Messages
14,134
I guess wife no 3 is the youngest :whistle: that's why I think that the more wives policy will not work the way the islamic leaders do imagine ;)
I don't think that a tuniasian male will burden himself with a new wife, who might not be a virgin, might have children or is his age. He'll go for the status wife, which he only gets if he has lots of money and the status wife will want to be wife no 1 :coffee:
 

Mystery

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Each wife must be treated equally each have they own house. He must provide for each of them and they children.
Hoping from house to house.
Seriously what man can afford to have 3 wives and a bunch of children.
A rat with a lot of western women to fund him.
A good muslim would not divorce it's frowned upon. Unless the wife did immoral deeds
Or the husband made up a lied, and let's face it who would believe a woman over a man in a country that men rule. His cousin will be the wife no 1
 

Mango Chutney

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I honestly do not know why a woman would choose that life.
Me either.....it's downright weird! If I wanted another woman to do my cooking and cleaning, I'd hire them....not agree to my husband having another wife.
I'd cry a million tears when he was in her room.
I don't understand this at all.
I guess some of the women want the social status of a married woman and mother, but not the attentions of a husband.....so maybe she's happy to share....I personally just find it bizarre.
 

Brasilgirl

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Me either.....it's downright weird! If I wanted another woman to do my cooking and cleaning, I'd hire them....not agree to my husband having another wife.
I'd cry a million tears when he was in her room.
I don't understand this at all.
I guess some of the women want the social status of a married woman and mother, but not the attentions of a husband.....so maybe she's happy to share....I personally just find it bizarre.
We live in a totally different world. I can’t imagine sharing my soulmate with anyone! And I say soulmate because I would not want to marry anyone I felt was less to me.
I think that is what makes it hard for us. We marry for love not convenience.
 

Mystery

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Joined
Aug 17, 2018
Messages
1,844
Just reading this thread again.....this part kills me every damn time :D:D:D
:D:D:D

You got me reading this again.
Even though I couldn't manage 3 husband's.:p
If I was in a marriage to a man with more than 1 wife then fair Is fair I would want 3 husband's.
They would be forced to work each day cook clean ECT. A girl can dream ;)
I think my brain needs reconstructed :eek:
 
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