Tunisian News & Current Affairs

Discussion in 'Tunisian News & Current Events' started by Bergo, Jul 7, 2012.

  1. Laura2014

    Laura2014 Well-Known Member

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    Very scary stuff. The tour companies Convey a picture of sand and sea but scratch the surface and there is discontent everywhere.
     
  2. Mango Chutney

    Mango Chutney Well-Known Member

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    I find it quite disturbing to see how the tour companies portray Tunisia.
    Innocent people go there with no idea of what lies under the surface, they believe they are safe, but these terrorists are everywhere, not just in the mountains and down south....they are spread all over, including in tourist areas...they live in regular family homes....anybody could be one.
    I only know all this stuff because I follow a mix of news channels online deliberately, for this site....most folk genuinely have no idea....and that is pretty frightening.
     
  3. Going for the limit

    Going for the limit Well-Known Member

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    Just sharing on here, if anyone is in tunisia or going soon please can you keep a look out
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Mango Chutney

    Mango Chutney Well-Known Member

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    Interesting little read.
    It shows how despite the false, progressive image Tunisia attempts to deceive the outside world with, it is....and always will be...constrained and dominated by the stone age dictation of Islam.

    Sure, there are a few progressives, but it seems the majority are still quite extreme and opposed to change....articles like this show me why young women like Nadou struggle to remain positive.

    Articles like this also make me wonder how many female rats will now materialise :(

    Inside Tunisia's Battle Over Inter-Religious Marriages
    A wedding in Tunis, Tunisia - Amine Landoulsi via Instagram


    Since 2017, Tunisian women have had the right to marry non-Muslims. But reality is playing out in different ways down on the local level amid an Islamist resurgence.
    Frédéric Bobin
    LE MONDE
    2018-09-15
    English editionWORLDCRUNCH



    KRAM — It's marriage season in Tunisia, and the town hall of this municipality north of Tunis, is staying open late into the evening. They have to accommodate everyone. Howls resonate inside the expansive hall, where a blissful couple — the groom in a striped tie and pink shirt and the bride draped in immaculate muslin — moves timidly forward along the tile floor.

    In his second-floor Kram office, Fathi Laayouni, wearing a fuchsia shirt, spreads out sheets of notes in front of him. Some passages are noticeably underlined in red. Laayouni, a lawyer by trade, prepares to speak. Before starting, he holds out a saucer with a baklava — a diamond shaped cake stuffed with pistachio and dried fruit — covered with a patina of honey. This is the heart of what is known, unofficially, as the Islamic Emirate of Kram. The moniker was conceived by a columnist from Buisinessnews.com, an online Tunisian news outlet, who apparently does not hold Laayouni close to her heart.

    Laayouni is the newly elected mayor of Kram. He is an extremely controversial character, even among his own Islamic faction. He savors this inflammatory reputation, even if he uses an ultra-conservative interpretation of Tunisian law to justify his deeply orthodox mindset. Laayouni launched himself into the national limelight when, in the heart of the summer, he proclaimed that he would never authorize a marriage in his jurisdiction between a Tunisian woman and a non-Muslim.


    The Islamist base has come back to life.


    In Tunisia, men have long had the right to marry non-Muslims, but women could not. Tunisian women were formally banned from unions with non-Muslims in a 1973 Justice Ministry memorandum, inspired by the country's Muslim traditions. This memorandum was repealed last fall by the president, Beji Caid Essebsi, who is eager to modernize the status of women in the country. Laayouni's proclamation was an open challenge to the president.

    Laayouni has taken up the resistance and ordered his registrar department to refuse mixed marriages. He has referenced the Constitution, ratified in 2014, and a peculiar reading of Article 5 of the Personal Status Law that goes back to 1956. The Constitution states that the nation has the responsibility to "protect the sacred," which is enough for Laayouni to affirm that he is just enforcing the law. Those who should be ashamed, according to Laayouni, are the "minority of extremists" who want to "eliminate religion" with their interpretation of the Constitution and use it to "destroy family and morality."

    [​IMG]

    Aerial view of Kram — Photo: Citizen59

    Laayouni is a part of the revival of orthodox Islamist ideology in Tunisia, which had held a low profile since 2013, when the rise of violent Salafism caused a backlash against political Islam. In this context, the Ennahda party, which was cast from the Islamic die but entered into a tactical alliance with its former modernist rivals in 2015, had enjoined its followers to take more moderate stances. That lasted about three years.

    Since the victory of Ennahda in the municipal elections on May 6, the Islamist base has come back to life. This new boldness has caused concern among one segment of the party that is concerned about its image in the West. But Laayouni is clever and appeals to Bourguiba's Constitution.

    But there are other town councilors who are at odds with Laayouni's vision. The battle over inter-religious marriage is, in fact, raging across the country. In Marsa, another village in northern Tunisia, the mayor, Slim Meherzi, a modernist with no party affiliation, has just celebrated a mixed marriage: a Tunisian woman with a Portuguese Catholic. He's very proud of it and is preparing to do it again in one month, this time with a French groom.

    "One must be uncompromising in the application of constitutional principles," Meherzi declares.

    His reading of the Constitution points to the stipulation that the state "guarantees freedom of conscience," that Tunisia is "a civil state founded on civic rights," and that "the citizens — men and women — must be equal in rights and in duties."


    This new boldness has caused concern.


    "Every Tunisian woman has the right to marry whom she wants: an atheist, a Buddhist, or whatever," says Meherzi.

    Others like the mayor of Ariana, a village close to Tunis, are also welcoming to mixed couples. Fadhel Moussa, a professor of law and member of the Constituent Assembly from 2011 to 2014, has extended his own invitation. "All couples are welcome in my city hall," he says. "For me, faith comes from deep down inside." Although he hasn't had a mixed marriage in his municipality yet, he says he's ready to perform one at the first opportunity.

    From Kram and Marsa to Ariana and on to other municipalities large and small, Tunisia is a nation of both contradictions and social change. The battle over mixed marriages is its new ideological front line.

    https://www.worldcrunch.com/world-affairs/inside-tunisia39s-battle-over-inter-religious-marriages
     
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  5. Mango Chutney

    Mango Chutney Well-Known Member

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    Oh, yippee freakin doo......them rats gonna be all over this one!!! FB certainly does it's best to make things easy for bezness!

    It messed up with friend requests by taking the 'nobody' option away, it messed up with Messenger by taking the 'friends only' option away....and now it's introducing this tosh :rolleyes:


    Screenshot_2018-09-20-19-21-14_kindlephoto-153345608.png

    Facebook Wants You to Find Love With Its New Dating Feature

    By Helen Holmes • 09/20/18 12:54pm
    [​IMG]

    Facebook’s new Dating feature is being marketed as an alternative to Tinder. SAM YEH/AFP/Getty Images

    As any 20-something languishing in Tinder purgatory will tell you, there’s nothing worse than exchanging a few, tentative messages with a cute photographer’s assistant in the area only to have his luster suddenly fade when he asks if he can guess your bra size.

    Today, Facebook begins publicly testing an online dating feature appropriately called Dating. Facebook hopes that the new feature (which it announced the launch of back in May) will appeal to people seeking meaningful relationships, and not just a quick hookup.




    As of right now, Dating is only available in Colombia. Users will be able to create profiles, and once it has generated enough profiles to start pairing up love-seekers, the feature will be off to the races and eventually available in North America.

    Nathan Sharp, a product manager at Facebook, told Wired writer Louise Matsakis that Facebook account holders who use Dating won’t be able to swipe right or left to indicate their interest in another person. Instead, they’ll have to answer one of the questions or comment on one of the photos set up on the user’s profile. In this way, the feature is similar to Hinge, an app that allows users to respond to prepared queries such as “What does your perfect day look like?”

    Additionally, Facebook Dating will occur in a forum separate from the established Messenger function. In the interest of security, potential mates won’t be able to send each other links, photos or third-party payment requests within the feature.

    As with Tinder, things really only move beyond preliminary introductions once users exchange numbers and switch from the match app to iMessage.

    Happy hunting, lovebirds!

    https://observer.com/2018/09/facebook-dating-beta-test-feature-colombia/

    It's currently being tested in Columbia....so we're safe for a while :thumbsup:
     
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  6. Judithlyn

    Judithlyn Well-Known Member

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    This is absolutely disgusting!!! I have been notifying and reporting all the fake Facebook profiles I see! Poor Messi and Ronaldo....How many profile pics can those 2 guys be in? Thousands since rats steal their images! Mine used another footballer...I forgot his name but they have no originality! Why are they too ashamed to post their own pics? Fake accounts! Ugh! Facebook is making fraud too easy! I’m thinking Facebook needs to be held accountable!
     
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  7. Mango Chutney

    Mango Chutney Well-Known Member

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    This is very sad...but I'm putting it here, as I wouldn't be surprised to hear rats have got the begging bowl out, to fix the flood damage....whether they were flooded or not, they will use these stories of other people's suffering, to benefit themselves:

    Tunisia: Record rainfall causes deadly floods.
    At least four killed as torrential rains lash the north African country, flooding roads and damaging property.

    6 hours ago

    [​IMG]
    Some areas in northeast Tunisia received as much as 197mm of rainfall [Fethi Belaid/AFP]
    Torrential rains and flooding in northeastern Tunisia have left at least four people dead, including two sisters, according to the country's interior ministry.

    A 60-year-old man drowned near the town of Takilsa, 60km east of the capital, Tunis, and another man was found dead in Bir Bouregba, close to the town of Hammamet, ministry spokesman Sofiene Zaag told AFP news agency on Sunday.

    In Bou Argoub, 45km southeast of the capital, two sisters were swept away by flash floods as they left the factory where they worked, Zaag said.

    All four died on Saturday.

    Advertisement

    Severe thunderstorms have hit the North African country since the middle of last week, flooding roads and damaging property.

    [​IMG]
    People gather at the site of a collapsed bridge in the Tunisian coastal town of Nabeul [Fethi Belaid/AFP]
    The destruction has sparked anger among citizens against the authorities for allegedly failing to maintain drainage systems.

    Some areas on Saturday received as much as 197mm of rainfall, half the country's annual precipitation, Zaag said.

    Videos posted on social media showed surging waters sweeping away cars and pieces of road in the north of the Cap Bon peninsula.

    Authorities took preventive measures in the Sahel region further south in anticipation of more rains, but by Sunday the floods appeared to have subsided.

    The sun was out on Sunday and receding water levels meant most of the area's roads were passable by car, Zaag said, although the region's telephone networks were still largely out of service.

    [​IMG]
    Cars washed away in the Tunisian coastal town of Nabeul following deadly flash flooding [Fethi Belaid/AFP]

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/09/tunisia-record-rainfall-deadly-floods-180923085352897.html
     
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  8. Heidi

    Heidi The Sleuth

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  9. Mango Chutney

    Mango Chutney Well-Known Member

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    It's horrendous, isn't it!! Authority help or not though....begging victims for cash is not on....which is why I've put it here, just in case.
    Their drainage system is shocking....it was always flooding when I was there, though it mostly didn't get in houses.
    Most regular families do not have insurance for houses and transport.
     
  10. yougogirl75

    yougogirl75 Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Sep 30, 2018
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  11. AmberHeart

    AmberHeart Well-Known Member

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  12. yougogirl75

    yougogirl75 Well-Known Member

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  13. Mango Chutney

    Mango Chutney Well-Known Member

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    Yup, the English pound is now worth 3.68 Dinar.....and our pound has dropped in value!! I've never known it this bad!
    We had a strong pound when I was there, the highest exchange rate I ever got was £1 - 3.2 Tnd.
    Would love to know what the exchange rate would have been if our pound hadn't lost value.....just to highlight how severe their financial issues are!!
    The prices of everything in Tunisia have risen drastically too....you can really see why they are so desperately trying to get to our lands of imaginary gold :rolleyes:
     
  14. AmberHeart

    AmberHeart Well-Known Member

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    Finally I could speak to my two best friends about my situation with the rat. Both made the same comment when I showed them pictures this man didn’t look he was in such desperate situation, they would ever guess he wanted to go out of his country or he needed cash. Had to give a brief explanation about their monetary law, education and culture. To conclude: they do not appear to be desperate and they act with sweetness to trap a Victim.
     
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  15. Mango Chutney

    Mango Chutney Well-Known Member

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    State of Emergency extended again....and the current issues in Tunisia do not make pleasant reading.

    Tunisia extends state of emergency
    By AFP

    PUBLISHED: 17:20, 5 October 2018 | UPDATED: 17:21, 5 October 2018



    • e-mail


    [​IMG]

    +1
    Tunisia's state of emergency was imposed in 2015 following a suicide bomb attack against a bus carrying presidential guards

    Tunisia's presidency on Friday announced the extension of the country's state of emergency, imposed in 2015 following a series of deadly jihadist attacks.

    The decision to prolong the state of emergency until November 6 comes amid a tense political climate ahead of legislative and presidential elections planned for next year.

    President Beji Caid Essebsi took the decision after meeting with the ministers of defence and interior, his office said without giving a reason for the extension.

    They discussed "the security and military situation in the country and at the borders", according to a statement.

    The president also consulted Prime Minister Youssef Chahed, despite strained relations between the two.

    The state of emergency grants exceptional powers to security forces, allowing them to ban strikes and meetings "likely to provoke... disorder".

    It also includes measures to "assume control of the press".

    The nationwide state of emergency was declared on November 24, 2015, after an attack in the capital Tunis which killed 12 presidential guards.

    The suicide bombing was claimed by the Islamic State group.

    Earlier the same year attacks by IS jihadists on the capital's Bardo museum and the coastal resort of Sousse left 59 tourists and a policeman dead.

    The most recent large-scale assault came in March 2016, when dozens of jihadists attacked security installations in the town of Ben Guerdane on the Libyan border.

    Thirteen security forces and seven civilians were killed.

    In Tunisia, which since its 2011 revolution has seen the emergence of jihadist groups, soldiers and police officers continue to be targeted particularly in mountainous areas bordering Algeria.

    On Wednesday, two soldiers were killed in a land mine blast during an anti-terrorist operation on Mount Chaambi near the Algerian frontier.

    Okba Ibn Nafaa, a Tunisia-based division of Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), is present in the area.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/afp/article-6244931/Tunisia-extends-state-emergency.html
     
  16. Mango Chutney

    Mango Chutney Well-Known Member

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    Oh dear :Cry: Wonder how long it will be before we get an influx of new members from these three EU countries: Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia? :(

    Screenshot_2018-10-12-01-20-10_kindlephoto-83762726.png
     
  17. Liona

    Liona Well-Known Member

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    Tunisia. Retrospective. ~1970s.

    tun.jpg tun1.jpg tun2.jpg tun4.jpg tun3.jpg tun5.jpg tun6.jpg
     
  18. Judithlyn

    Judithlyn Well-Known Member

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    I saw flooding in the south close to the Sahara when I was there! It shocked me because I thought it never rained in or next to deserts! His friend drove a rental car (which I paid for) through the flood! I was terrified that we would get swept away! We made it but other cars stayed out of the flooded waters! Not us....in we went!
     
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  19. Laura2014

    Laura2014 Well-Known Member

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    Apparently the recent flooding was because they had very heavy rain and needed to release a dam. They just forgot to tell anyone they were doing it and millions of gallons of water was released.
     
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  20. Judithlyn

    Judithlyn Well-Known Member

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    Too bad rats did not drown!
     
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  21. Mango Chutney

    Mango Chutney Well-Known Member

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    I'm looking forward to seeing how effective this new law is, a few years down the line.
    Racism against black people, Jewish people and Western infidels is shocking in Tunisia....and it is ingrained into them from birth.....it's a sure thing they won't beat this disgusting behaviour within the current generations....but maybe there is hope for the next, though I doubt it.
    I've never heard such despicable racism as I heard in Tunisia...it really upset me. As if the colour of your skin or your country of origin define who you are!
    They are obsessed with white skin, hence all the creams,make-up, and the insistence that they are white....as we've seen with members on here....remember RIP? He was obsessed!
    And they have the cheek to tell us we are racist because we expose them as rats :rolleyes:

    Tunisia 'needs a cultural revolution' to combat racism
    Tunisia becomes first Arab country to criminalise racial discrimination in move activists hail as historic.

    by Asma Ajroudi
    17 hours ago
    • [​IMG]

    Tunisia's black minority has long complained of racial discrimination [File: Mohamed Messara/EPA]
    Tunis, Tunisia - When Ghofrane Binous was a child, she was told she was dirty because her skin was black.

    Binous, now a flight attendant with Tunisia's national carrier Tunisair, recounted how children in her neighbourhood excluded her from their play one day, telling her: "All of you is dirty because you are black and your family does not bathe you."

    She returned home crying that day and scrubbed her face until it was raw. Later on, she said she started using bleach on her face because she was told it would make her skin lighter.

    Many Tunisians are "instinctively racist", Binous said, explaining that racism and discrimination are everyday occurrences for many black Tunisians.

    Advertisement

    In May, Binous made global headlines when a disgruntled passenger on a Tunisair flight called her a racial slur.

    WATCH: Tunisia - equal inheritance laws for women still controversial (2:22)


    "She could have criticised Tunisair. Instead, she targeted my person," said Binous. "I don't remember ever crying that hard."

    The incident prompted the captain to deplane the passenger and sparked outrage on social media. Binous was also called to the parliament's rights committee, where legislators expressed solidarity with her and called for an investigation.

    The passenger never faced action, according to Binous.

    But that could change now.

    Last Tuesday, Tunisia's parliament voted to criminalise racial discrimination, in a vote activists hailed as historic in the North African country, where unofficial estimates say 15 percent of the 11.5 million population identify as black.

    Under the new legislation, those convicted of racist speech face one month in prison and a $350 fine, while incitement to hatred, making racist threats, or belonging to an organisation that propagates racism can result in one to three years in prison and fines ranging from $185 to $1,110.

    The law makes Tunisia the first Arab country, and the second in Africa, to outlaw racial discrimination.

    But activists say a lot more is needed to change racist beliefs, which they say remain deeply ingrained in Tunisian society.

    Verbal and physical attacks
    Tunisia was the first Arab country to abolish slavery in 1846, but black Tunisians remained marginalised socially, economically and politically in the subsequent decades, while racist speech and conduct was passed on from generation to generation.

    In Tunisia, the words "kahlouch", a pejorative term for "black, and "woussif", which translates to "slave-servant", are widely used to identify a black person. Yet activists say many light-skinned Tunisians do not believe the country has a problem.

    When campaigners first started organising public protests against racism in 2013, they said only a handful of people turned up.

    REPORTER’S NOTEBOOK
    Tunis bookbinder 'giving life' to ancient manuscripts
    [​IMG]
    by Jillian Kestler-D'Amours
    Rania Belhaj Romdhane, an organiser at Mnemty, a prominent minority-rights group, said the public at the time "didn't understand what we were saying".

    "We had to convince Tunisian society that there was a phenomenon to be talked about."

    According to Mnemty, black people in Tunisia are frequently the target of verbal abuse, and sometimes, physical attacks because of their skin colour.

    In recent years, such incidents have gained media attention, paving the way for the adoption of the anti-racism law.

    They include the 2016 cases of segregated buses in the country's south which carried white and black school children and the stabbing of three Congolese students in a Tunis train station on Christmas Eve.

    This August, several young Tunisian men threw stones at a pregnant Ivorian woman near her home in the capital. Her husband and another Ivorian man intervened, and were injured in an ensuing fight.

    While these events sparked a national debate, activists said none of them resulted in prosecutions, with authorities citing a lack of laws or a lack of witnesses.

    Black people in public life
    Meanwhile, very few black Tunisians are represented in the country's politics and media

    There is only one black member of parliament - Jamila Debbech Ksiksi, while the country saw its first black news anchor only in May.

    The absence of black people in public life has led black children to think of their skin colour as an obstacle, said Zied Rouin, another member of Mnemty.

    "If you ask black children here if they like their skin colour they will say, 'No'," said Rouin.

    The pervasive racism in Tunisia has begun to affect the country's image and credibility abroad, said Mack Arthur Deongane Yopasho, a black student leader.

    WATCH: Tunisia's revolution - Relatives of victims demand justice (2:38)


    The North African country has long been a popular destination for medical and engineering students from sub-Saharan Africa. However, in recent years, the number of sub-Saharan students dropped by the thousands, from 12,000 in 2010 to 5,000 in 2018.

    While some attribute the drop to the political turmoil in the country following the revolution that overthrew long-time President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali in 2011, Deongane Yopasho believes racism also played a factor.

    In addition to verbal and physical abuse, sub-Saharan African students face institutional racism, which includes delays in obtaining visas and difficulties in accessing healthcare and jobs.

    "It is in Tunisia's interests to host [foreign] students,' Deongane Yopasho said. And if the country hopes to attract 20,000 Sub-Saharan African students by 2020, as stated by its government, it must apply the new law," he said.

    'Cultural revolution'
    Hamza Ben Achour, a black Tunisian music artist, said the new law was just the beginning in the fight against racism.

    "The law will not change anything. We need a cultural revolution," he said. In 2015, his rap song "Kahlouch", which explored how black Tunisians were treated as second-class citizens, sparked an uproar, with many Tunisians denying the existence of any societal prejudice.

    He was accused of "inciting civil strife; of being sick; of being selfish", he said.

    Binous, the flight attendant agreed with Ben Achour.


    She said while the new law would help her if she were to face racial abuse from passengers, much more needs to be done to dismantle and discredit racist beliefs.

    "I am an adult now, and I can handle humiliation," said Binous. "But children cannot."

    "My sister was playing on the street the other day. An adult man turned to her and said: 'If God loved you, he wouldn't have created you black.' She was 10-years-old," she said.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018...revolution-combat-racism-181014134348043.html
     
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  22. Apples

    Apples Well-Known Member

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    This was sent to me last night. I understand some but not all. Tunisians are racist (some).
     

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  23. Heidi

    Heidi The Sleuth

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    9FAC7DBE-B0CD-4813-8A0D-E4B723EBBC23.png 17098486-0AF9-48E4-B455-33BE4B229714.png

    So you are a racist because you don't want the rat 24.gif
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2018 at 7:18 PM
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  24. Mango Chutney

    Mango Chutney Well-Known Member

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    Blimey.....friendly bloke, ain't he :rolleyes:
    He called you a bitch I think.....he definitely told you to go f*ck your mother.
    Don't reply to these fishing rats, Apples....I have hundreds of them message me....I just ignore them all.
     
  25. Heidi

    Heidi The Sleuth

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