Tunisian News & Current Affairs

Brasilgirl

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tunisians are not racist only to black people , they are also racist among themselves , my sister has a dark medium tone some of the kids in her school don't want to be friends with her they think she's dirty for some reason and they are only children , when i walk with her they don't believe we are sisters and keep saying it's a shame she doesn't look like you i think she hates her skin colour , girls buy foundations tha don't match their skin tone ,always looking for fairness creams , tell someone i want a tan and they will be laughing at you , a girl i know has a lovely golden tone just like jennifer lopez i told her i liked what she looks like but she was offended she thought i was making a joke of her ,what tunisians and other north africans don't get is that we are all africans ,african doesn't mean just black ,it's about diversity africans can be black ,white ,olive ect... they think they don't belong in africa and so they hate black africans .
It is so rediculous. They don’t like darker skin, but they hate white people. And most white people dont care what colour a persons skin is. (There are always exceptions). Then they grow up and want to get a visa to a country where they will look even darker against the pale white people.
Sheesh.
 

Mango Chutney

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freckles are cute haha but i'm fighting them like there is no tomorrow ,you know they are actually signs of aging
I fight mine too.....I hate them :D
Really, a sign of aging? Even young kids have them....mine have been here since I was very young, but exposure to sun really highlights them....and I am the world's biggest fan of sun cream.
Do you mean age spots? They do kinda look like big freckles...
I am in Germany now and I know there is racism everywhere, BUT I can honestly say, this country has been amazing to me. When i walk in the store they dont stare and I feel so comfortable. They treat me like a human, not by my race.
This is lovely :love:
 

Brasilgirl

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i'm happy you are living in a place where you feel like yourself . freckles are cute haha but i'm fighting them like there is no tomorrow ,you know they are actually signs of aging :Cry: sorry i'm obsessed with skincare my friends say that all i'm talking about is night cream ,retinol serums and sunscreen :D:D
You will look young forever. :D:p
 

nadou88

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I fight mine too.....I hate them :D
Really, a sign of aging? Even young kids have them....mine have been here since I was very young, but exposure to sun really highlights them....and I am the world's biggest fan of sun cream.
Do you mean age spots? They do kinda look like big freckles...


yes the sun highlights them , they were not visible on me , i wear sunscreen everyday , every 2 hours and still get them ,maybe the sun here is strong idk :D
 

nadou88

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You will look young forever. :D:p
oh i doubt it :D:D i didn't know about skincare till i was 17 , i used to stay in the sun for 2+ hours with no sunscreen i thought it was nice and healthy to look red ,oh god i thought peeling skin meant you are having a new skin didn't know it was called sunburn . i wish i can stay young forever aging is my worst fear
 

Brasilgirl

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oh i doubt it :D:D i didn't know about skincare till i was 17 , i used to stay in the sun for 2+ hours with no sunscreen i thought it was nice and healthy to look red ,oh god i thought peeling skin meant you are having a new skin didn't know it was called sunburn . i wish i can stay young forever aging is my worst fear
The best thing you can do for your skin is sunscreen and eat healthy. Drink lots of good water. In Brasil I only drink bottled water or pre boiled water. Pre boiled is just as good and is cheaper. Just boil a pot and put it in a clean coke bottle or water bottle.
 

Mango Chutney

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Don't worry though, folks....it's safe, remember....so let's just keep flying jet loads of innocent tourists over, eh?
Afterall, what's a few beheadings and unknown volumes of returned jihadists? :rolleyes:

jihadi comeback in Tunisia


Al-Monitor Staff February 21, 2019



The anti-terrorism arm of Tunisia’s National Guard has launched a formal investigation into the murder of a man who disappeared two days ago in the central province of Sidi Bouzid after his head was found in a military no-go zone on Mount Mghilla.

Why it matters: The murder of construction worker Mohamed Lakhdar ben Salem Mahkloufi, 55, recalls the 2015 beheading of Mabrouk Soltani, a 16-year-old shepherd, on the same mountain. Soltani’s murder was claimed by Jund al-Khilafah, the Tunisian branch of the Islamic State, which advertised the beheading in a video and went on to murder the shepherd’s brother. In January a Tunisian court convicted 49 people in Soltani’s murder, including 45 in absentia. But nobody has yet claimed killing Mahkloufi.

Between a rock and a hard place: In June of last year, another shepherd was killed by jihadis in a closed military zone on Mount Chaambi in neighboring Kasserine province, near the Algerian border. The area is also home to the al-Qaeda-linked Okba Ibn Nafaa battalion, which executed two shepherds in 2015. Last year the group tortured another shepherd they accused of “espionage” on behalf of the security forces, beating him and cutting off his nose. The shepherd died of his wounds.

The al-Qaeda and Islamic State militants, whose numbers remain unknown but are estimated to be small, force villagers to provide them with food and other essentials. Should the villagers refuse, they face the prospect of ending up like the shepherds. When they cooperate with the militants, however, the villagers run the risk of winding up behind bars for “aiding terrorists.”

A jihadi comeback? Tunisia has been in a state of emergency since November 2015, when the Islamic State claimed a suicide bombing in Tunis that killed 12 presidential guards. A wave of lethal attacks that same year targeting the country’s crucial tourism industry has undermined the North African nation’s efforts to stabilize its fledgling democracy and wobbly economy. Extremist attacks have sharply declined thanks to help from Europe, Algeria and the United States, with stricter monitoring of Tunisia’s borders with Libya in particular.

Worries of a jihadi resurgence, however, are growing as the US-led coalition’s war against the Islamic State in Syria draws to a close. Thousands of Tunisians joined the jihadis in Syria, with around 150 of them being held by the US-allied Syrian Democratic Forces along with roughly 650 other foreign fighters. The Kurdish-dominated force is desperate to get the jihadis off its hands. Tunisia and Iraq are among a few countries that are taking them back.

Mokhtar Ben Nasr, the head of the government’s National Counterterrorism Commission, recently told lawmakers that 1,000 Islamic State fighters had returned to Tunisia over the past seven years. With the Syria war all but over, the trend could accelerate. Some jihadis, he said, had been arrested and were awaiting prosecution; but many others had crept in secretly, their whereabouts unknown.

Sharan Greeal, a fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Center for Middle East Policy, told Al-Monitor, “So far the government’s approach to returnees has been to put them in prison, under house arrest or surveillance. But there’s not much focus on de-radicalization in prisons or on rehabilitation and reintegration. So the danger is what happens once they are released.” Worse, Gerwal added, “For many returnees there may not be even sufficient evidence to take them to trial. And leaving them under house arrest or surveillance may simply re-create the repressive and marginalized conditions that fed their extremism in the first place.”

What’s next: Tunisia is set to hold presidential and parliamentary elections by the end of this year. The threat of jihadism has become a political football, with the country’s secularists using it to whack the country’s most popular party, the pro-Islamist Ennahda, with whom they share power. Ennahda rebuts claims that during its brief spell at the helm of government it encouraged Tunisians to go fight in Syria. Amid all the squabbling, endemic corruption, police brutality and rampant unemployment make for an ideal breeding ground for a new generation of radicals.

Learn more: Read about the fate of Tunisia’s returning jihadis here.

-Amberin Zaman



Read more: https://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2019/02/intel-jihadist-tunisia-mountain-comeback.html#ixzz5gJOFuh6J
 

Femme Fatale

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Don't worry though, folks....it's safe, remember....so let's just keep flying jet loads of innocent tourists over, eh?
Afterall, what's a few beheadings and unknown volumes of returned jihadists? :rolleyes:

jihadi comeback in Tunisia


Al-Monitor Staff February 21, 2019



The anti-terrorism arm of Tunisia’s National Guard has launched a formal investigation into the murder of a man who disappeared two days ago in the central province of Sidi Bouzid after his head was found in a military no-go zone on Mount Mghilla.

Why it matters: The murder of construction worker Mohamed Lakhdar ben Salem Mahkloufi, 55, recalls the 2015 beheading of Mabrouk Soltani, a 16-year-old shepherd, on the same mountain. Soltani’s murder was claimed by Jund al-Khilafah, the Tunisian branch of the Islamic State, which advertised the beheading in a video and went on to murder the shepherd’s brother. In January a Tunisian court convicted 49 people in Soltani’s murder, including 45 in absentia. But nobody has yet claimed killing Mahkloufi.

Between a rock and a hard place: In June of last year, another shepherd was killed by jihadis in a closed military zone on Mount Chaambi in neighboring Kasserine province, near the Algerian border. The area is also home to the al-Qaeda-linked Okba Ibn Nafaa battalion, which executed two shepherds in 2015. Last year the group tortured another shepherd they accused of “espionage” on behalf of the security forces, beating him and cutting off his nose. The shepherd died of his wounds.

The al-Qaeda and Islamic State militants, whose numbers remain unknown but are estimated to be small, force villagers to provide them with food and other essentials. Should the villagers refuse, they face the prospect of ending up like the shepherds. When they cooperate with the militants, however, the villagers run the risk of winding up behind bars for “aiding terrorists.”

A jihadi comeback? Tunisia has been in a state of emergency since November 2015, when the Islamic State claimed a suicide bombing in Tunis that killed 12 presidential guards. A wave of lethal attacks that same year targeting the country’s crucial tourism industry has undermined the North African nation’s efforts to stabilize its fledgling democracy and wobbly economy. Extremist attacks have sharply declined thanks to help from Europe, Algeria and the United States, with stricter monitoring of Tunisia’s borders with Libya in particular.

Worries of a jihadi resurgence, however, are growing as the US-led coalition’s war against the Islamic State in Syria draws to a close. Thousands of Tunisians joined the jihadis in Syria, with around 150 of them being held by the US-allied Syrian Democratic Forces along with roughly 650 other foreign fighters. The Kurdish-dominated force is desperate to get the jihadis off its hands. Tunisia and Iraq are among a few countries that are taking them back.

Mokhtar Ben Nasr, the head of the government’s National Counterterrorism Commission, recently told lawmakers that 1,000 Islamic State fighters had returned to Tunisia over the past seven years. With the Syria war all but over, the trend could accelerate. Some jihadis, he said, had been arrested and were awaiting prosecution; but many others had crept in secretly, their whereabouts unknown.

Sharan Greeal, a fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Center for Middle East Policy, told Al-Monitor, “So far the government’s approach to returnees has been to put them in prison, under house arrest or surveillance. But there’s not much focus on de-radicalization in prisons or on rehabilitation and reintegration. So the danger is what happens once they are released.” Worse, Gerwal added, “For many returnees there may not be even sufficient evidence to take them to trial. And leaving them under house arrest or surveillance may simply re-create the repressive and marginalized conditions that fed their extremism in the first place.”

What’s next: Tunisia is set to hold presidential and parliamentary elections by the end of this year. The threat of jihadism has become a political football, with the country’s secularists using it to whack the country’s most popular party, the pro-Islamist Ennahda, with whom they share power. Ennahda rebuts claims that during its brief spell at the helm of government it encouraged Tunisians to go fight in Syria. Amid all the squabbling, endemic corruption, police brutality and rampant unemployment make for an ideal breeding ground for a new generation of radicals.

Learn more: Read about the fate of Tunisia’s returning jihadis here.

-Amberin Zaman



Read more: https://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2019/02/intel-jihadist-tunisia-mountain-comeback.html#ixzz5gJOFuh6J
I used to have this conversation with my rat all the time. His response was, Tunisia is safe. Not one care in the world for my safety. Then he would try to justify it by explaining that there are terrorist everywhere in the world. Yeah, but the difference between my country and yours is we hold them accountable. Our moms, dads and grandparents don't welcome them back home, giving them safe haven because they bring home the money, would be my response to him. We will snitch and go straight to local law enforcement, who thens go to FBI. Its called law and order. We don't give excuses for bad people. We dont give a crap if we the same religion, family or not.

He would then question our family values. I dont want a known terrorist near me or my family even if it was my own dad and brothers.

There is no stable law and order in Tunisia. If it was, bezness would be a crime like it is in most countries. Tunisia is like the wild wild west, hell, even the wild wild west had law and order. Too many rogue criminals, terrorist running around for such a small country. All tourist and visitors are asking for is a little more safety and stability when they visit. I told him if he would come to my country, he would have the safety of the local police and so much more. Cant bribe them, they will throw you in jail cus its an insult to them and their job. Mama cant hide them either cus they will throw her old ass in jail too.

PS: Also why visit a country so unstable, even their own people don't understand or read the law. Basic questions id ask my rat and his response, "you think too much."
 

Femme Fatale

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So the danger is what happens once they are released.” Worse, Gerwal added, “For many returnees there may not be even sufficient evidence to take them to trial. And leaving them under house arrest or surveillance may simply re-create the repressive and marginalized conditions that fed their extremism in the first place.”
(In my rats voice)......to simplify, we simply don't have a solution. Let them roam free like chickens until they do something drastic. Then we will do something, the news will capture it and the global world will see that we are proactively fighting terrorism. But don't tell them that we didn't have a solution in the first place. But wait there is more.....after the smoke settles, we will turn their attention back to our tourism. Terrorism will still be roaming our country freely. Just in the mountains. But the animation team will distract them anyway :whistle:
 

Snuggle

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Mmm I just got invited by my rat to do a road trip around Tunisia. When I told him I would never set a foot in that country because it’s not safe, he didn’t agree. I said to him it would be a nice trip for him and his Tunisian wife to be :D
 

Mango Chutney

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Times are getting harder and harder. Those rats are going to be becoming increasingly more desperate to get to our lands of milk and honey, to get their thieving paws on our hard earned money. No marriage, no visas, no cash, no anchor babies, no gifts.....give the trash NOTHING!

Tunisian Central Bank projects ‘frightening’ economic outlook

Lamine Ghanmi
The value of energy imports quadrupled and earnings from phosphate exports and tourism shrank 75% and 50%, respectively.

https://thearabweekly.com/tunisian-central-bank-projects-frightening-economic-outlook
 

Mango Chutney

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This is a threat across the entire country of Tunisia.



Internal Threats to Tunisian Security—From the Borders to the Cities
By: Stefano Maria Torelli
March 1, 2019 08:36 PM Age: 2 days


(source: middleeasteye.net)
Background

Tunisia is currently going through a very delicate phase in its development. Political tensions are intensifying with the presidential and parliamentary elections scheduled for the end of 2019. The two parties that formed the coalition government, Ennahda and Nida Tounes, are campaigning in open competition against each other. The socio-economic indicators are alarming, with the Tunisian dinar losing 40 percent of its value over the euro in the last two years; the cost of living increasing by a third; and unemployment levels still among the highest in the world. The social discontent was made evident by the hundreds of protests and strikes that paralyzed the country last January. In this context, the security situation is also a cause for concern. The risk that Tunisia could be destabilized in this vulnerable phase is substantial. Although there have been no attacks on the scale of the multiple 2015 attacks against the Bardo Museum in Tunis, a resort in Sousse, and a bus carrying military personnel in Tunis, there continues to be a latent threat.


These potential terrorists add to the more than 800 foreign fighters who have already returned to Tunisia and the hundreds of radicalized citizens still present across the country. The latter category causes the greatest concern for security. The risk of a tactical shift from guerrilla warfare to large-scale attacks and the threat from “lone wolf” terrorism is high. The social tensions of recent months contribute to a climate of general violence, which can easily be exploited by recruiters and radicalized Tunisians.

More here:

https://jamestown.org/program/the-terrorist-threat-in-tunisia-from-the-borders-to-the-cities/
 

Mango Chutney

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No surprise here, but it keeps us updated :)

Tunisia extends state of emergency

Tunisia has extended the state of emergency that has been in place since November 2015 for a further month.

The state of emergency was imposed following a suicide attack on a police bus and has been extended a number of times.

As part of its advice the travellers, the UK Foreign Office said the British government has been working with the Tunisian authorities to investigate the attack on British tourists in the holiday resort of Sousse in June 2015.

"The Tunisian government has improved protective security in major cities and tourist resorts," it said, "but terrorists are still very likely to try to carry out attacks in Tunisia, including against UK and Western interests.

"Security forces remain on a high state of alert in Tunis and other places. You should be vigilant at all times, including around religious sites and festivals."

https://www.travelmole.com/news_feature.php?news_id=2036475&c=setreg&region=2
 

Laura2014

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Don’t think I ever saw an “alert” security guard. Mostly they had a cigarette in one hand and a phone in the other. Can’t say I would trust my life to any of them. The man throwing tiles off the roof was the most effective.
 

Mango Chutney

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Don’t think I ever saw an “alert” security guard. Mostly they had a cigarette in one hand and a phone in the other.
Yes! :D
At Bardo, they were a long way from the museum entry, playing cards and sleeping.....didn't even glance at us. Inside the museum, you put your bag through the scanning device....bugger wasn't even looking at his screen :D
At El Jem, Kélibia Tower, Uthina etc....there was no security at all.....yet these are recognised tourist areas...and I visited them all AFTER the two attacks :thumbsup:
 

Going for the limit

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I read that, that 2 victims from the beach attack came back to visit recently.
I really hope now that they have the closure they were looking for.
Without a doubt it is not something anyone could and ever will get over.
 

Heidi

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Changed safety instructions of the German Embassy - Medical Information
5 April 2019 Editors 1740 Views Federal Foreign Office, Measles, Security Advice

The Foreign Office in Germany has updated the medical information for Tunisia. Also, due to the measles that are currently occurring in Tunisia in some places, which has already claimed fatalities, a measles vaccine for adults and children when traveling to Tunisia is strongly recommended.

Below is an excerpt from the travel and safety information for Tunisia (as of 5 April 2019)

In January 2019, WHO declared a lack of vaccine protection against measles as a threat to global health. A review and, if necessary, supplementation of the vaccination against measles for adults and children is therefore strongly recommended at the latest in the travel preparation.

http://www.tunesienexplorer.de/2019/04/05/geaenderte-sicherheitshinweise-der-deutschen-botschaft-medizinische-hinweise/
 

Mystery

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[Continued]
...Because of their experience, the women proceeded to organize feminist-specific demonstrations, but were often harassed by their male counterparts, who believed their demand to abolish the Family Law untimely. This led Qureshi to ask: “If now is not the time, then when is?”

“Our demands do not conflict with the public demand, which is that that we want a free, democratic Algeria,” she told Raseef22. “But this demand cannot be accomplished without liberating the Algerian women, and so we call for the abolition of the Family Law, because it oppressed Algerian women and is reactionary.”


Uthmani called for freedom and gender equality, in addition to changing the Family Law to accommodate Algerian women of the present day.

“Amending this law is a human right before being a feminist one, because it oppresses the woman and her freedom in the name of religion and authority,” she said. “We should participate in formulating laws that can protect us in a patriarchal society, and that will not be fixed between day and night.”
The family law still exist there women will never be liberated.
I do believe and this is just me, the women is not happy with they way of life but they will remain that way until them themselves stand up for women's rights. They are like sheep follow what the men tell them to do. Yes I see poverty but they stay that way until they tell the lazy men get out and work. The men do nothing each and every day. It's ok to say there's nothing to do, it's bloody disgusting there why don't these men get and clean the shit hole up. Make the area clean and safe for they wives and children.
Why the men so needy? They should be looking after they families not the women on social media. They think the grass is greener well get off your phone's and make your grass greener.
The women think about putting on they lippy smiling sweetly ffs stop moaning about your lives stop being sheep. Tell them men you all had enough getting married producing 10 children in poverty is not every thing. They are not good men who scam and steal so you get your bread each day. The government give you free housing not to rent but to own, you get free coffee and sugar. Many things is free there so stop your bloody whining and beat them around they heads with a pan. Wake them up then maybe your lives with get better. You women is a bloody disgrace you post cute chic pics and in reality your dressed worse that my granny. You never bloody shower just spray more purfume and you stink of fish. Your breath smells like horse shit but dont forget your lippy.:eek:
 

Mango Chutney

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Good old 'We are more liberal, we are the same as Europeans' Tunisians :Evil:

How the hell can they say they are progressive when they still live by the dictates of Sharia, which should have no place in a democracy? :Evil:


Home World World - LGBTQ Rights Homophobic Tunisia invokes sharia law in bid to shut down LGBTQ rights...


Photo By אנדר-ויק (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
Homophobic Tunisia invokes sharia law in bid to shut down LGBTQ rights group

By News Room
-

April 30, 2019

Judicial harassment and rise in arrests under anti-sodomy law add to climate of tension and fear.


10

One of the Arab world’s most visible advocacy groups defending the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning and intersex people is facing closure following legal threats by the government.

Association Shams has been officially operating in Tunisia since 2015, helping the country’s LGBTQ community repeal article 230 of its penal code, a French colonial law, which criminalises homosexuality with up to three years in jail.

The government failed to permanently suspend Shams’ activities in a 2016 lawsuit, but is appealing the ruling. A hearing is scheduled for Friday.


https://mysocalledgaylife.co.uk/2019/04/homophobic-tunisia-invokes-sharia-law-in-bid-to-shut-down-lgbtq-rights-group/
 

tipme

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It is so rediculous. They don’t like darker skin, but they hate white people. And most white people dont care what colour a persons skin is. (There are always exceptions). Then they grow up and want to get a visa to a country where they will look even darker against the pale white people.
Sheesh.
pure wankers
 

Mango Chutney

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Just to keep us up to date :)


https://news.cgtn.com/news/3d3d514d786b444e34457a6333566d54/index.html

Middle East 15:40, 06-May-2019
Analysis: Tunisia's elections under cloud after state of emergency extended
By Abhishek G Bhaya


Tunisia's nearly four-year long state of emergency was yet again extended on Friday for a period of 30 days beginning May 6 and ending on June 4, drawing a fresh cloud of uncertainty over the political readiness of the country ahead of crucial parliamentary and presidential election later this year.

The North African has been under a near-constant state of emergency since June 2015. Although briefly lifted in October 2015, it was reinstated on November 24, 2015, after an ISIL-claimed suicide bombing in Tunis killed 12 presidential guards.

Ever since, the state of emergency has been extended several times with the previous such decision imposed by Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi on April 6, which expired on Monday.
 

Heidi

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10.05.2019 - 20:17 clock

At least 65 people drowned off the Tunisian coast, according to the UN refugee agency UNHCR.

The boat, with which the migrants wanted to get to Europe, had gone down about 80 kilometers from the Tunisian coastal town of Sfax, the organization said on Friday. It is the worst incident for several months.

The Tunisian news agency TAP spoke with reference to local authorities even of 70 dead.

Fishermen who had been near the scene of the accident saved 16 people from drowning. One person was taken directly to the hospital, while others waited in the southern city of Zarzis for permission to go ashore, the UNHCR said.

According to authorities, the migrants came mainly from countries south of the Sahara. On late Thursday evening, they made their way to Europe in the Libyan port city of Suara, survivors told the UNHCR. Subsequently, the boat got into distress due to high waves.
 
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