Tunisian News & Current Affairs

Discussion in 'Tunisian News & Current Events' started by Bergo, Jul 7, 2012.

  1. Mango Chutney

    Mango Chutney Well-Known Member

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    Tunisia attacks: Militants jailed over 2015 terror
    • 40 minutes ago
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    [​IMG]Image copyrightREUTERS
    Image captionThe beach attack targeted tourists
    Seven jihadists have been sentenced to life in prison in Tunisia over attacks at a museum and a beach resort in 2015.

    Sixty people, mostly tourists, died in the two attacks and many were wounded.

    Some of the many defendants received lesser sentences and 27 were acquitted. Prosecutors plan to appeal.

    The first attack, at the Bardo Museum in Tunis in March 2015 killed 22. Three months later, 38 tourists, most of them British, were shot dead at Port El Kantaoui, near Sousse.

    The so-called Islamic State group said it had carried out the attacks.

    The man believed to have planned both, Chamseddine al-Sandi, remains at large. Unconfirmed reports suggested he may have died in a US air strike in February 2016 in Libya.

    There were two separate trials. In the Sousse trial, four militants were given life sentences, while five others were sentenced to between six months and 16 years. In the Bardo trial, three defendants received life terms and a number of others were jailed for shorter periods. Ten were acquitted.

    How the attacks unfolded

    Media captionThe sounds of gunfire triggered panic and confusion in the museum
    On 18 March, two gunmen in military uniforms stormed the National Bardo Museum, near the city's parliament buildings, where anti-terrorism legislation was under discussion.

    Twenty-two people, including 17 foreign tourists, were killed - 21 at the scene and one more 10 days later. Among the dead were citizens from Japan, Italy, Colombia, Australia, France, Poland and Spain.

    Two Tunisians, one a police officer, were also killed. More than 40 people were injured. The attackers, Tunisian citizens Yassine Labidi and Saber Khachnaoui, were killed by police.

    Three months later, on 26 June, a Tunisian electronics student, Seifeddine Rezgui, opened fire on tourists staying in the popular resort of Port El Kantaoui, just north of Sousse.

    [​IMG]Image copyrightAFP
    Image captionThis image of the Seifeddine Rezgui was distributed by IS-linked social media accounts
    Rezgui was dropped off down a side road, a short distance from the beach, and walked the rest of the way with a Kalashnikov rifle hidden in a parasol. When he arrived at the five-star Hotel Rui Imperial Marhaba, he opened fire indiscriminately at tourists on sun loungers on the beach.

    As holidaymakers fled for their lives, the gunman continued his attack, entering the hotel complex via the pool area. He killed 38 people before fleeing into the streets, where he was shot by police.

    [​IMG]
    A state of emergency has been in place in Tunisia since the attacks.

    The nation's already faltering tourism industry was badly hit, but it has shown signs of recovery in the past year with travel bans lifted by several countries, including the UK.

    There has been considerable progress in combating jihadists in Tunisia thanks to concerted international help, according to the BBC's Middle East analyst, Sebastian Usher, but the militants still pose a potent threat while the endemic problems of chronic unemployment and lack of economic opportunity persist.

    The victims
    Thirty of the 38 who lost their lives in the beach attack were British.

    Among the dead were a 24-year-old beauty blogger; a 49-year-old man, his father and his nephew; and several couples on holiday together.

    Beauty blogger Carly Lovett had recently got engaged to Liam, her childhood sweetheart of 10 years.

    Adrian Evans, 49, from Tipton in the West Midlands, died along with his father, 78-year-old Charles (known as Patrick) Evans, and nephew Joel Richards, 19, from Wednesbury.

    A number of married couples lost their lives. William Graham, 51, and Lisa Graham, 50, were in Tunisia to celebrate Mrs Graham's 50th birthday.

    The victims of the Bardo museum attack came from around the world.

    Three Japanese tourists died, alongside four Italians, three French, two Colombians, two Spaniards, and one national each from Russia and Britain. Two Tunisian citizens, including one police officer, died.

    More than 50 people were wounded.

    [​IMG]
    Image captionMost of those who died in the Tunisian beach attack were British.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-47183027
     
    juicyfruit, Jisela, Heidi and 2 others like this.
  2. Mango Chutney

    Mango Chutney Well-Known Member

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    This is justice? It is in Tunisia :Evil:
    The evil seem to get protected, the victims suffer even more :Cry:


    February 9, 2019 9:13AM EST Dispatches
    Rape Victim Lands Behind Bars in Tunisia

    End ‘Sodomy’ Prosecutions, Forced Anal Examinations

    [​IMG]
    Neela Ghoshal
    Senior Researcher, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Rights ProgramNeelaGhoshal

    [​IMG]
    Imagine seeking police assistance after being gang raped – and finding yourself behind bars. This is what happened to 22-year-old A.F., who was arrested on charges of homosexual conduct after he went to a police station in the southern Tunisian town of Sfax in January to report the assault.

    Instead of treating A.F. as a victim in need of support, police detained him and subjected him to a forced anal examinationat a local hospital. These unscientific and invasive “exams,” in which doctors penetrate a victim with a finger or an object to assess whether they “habitually” engage in anal sex, violate international law and can be traumatic for anyone who undergoes them – let alone a rape victim. Badr Baabou, the president of Damj, a Tunisian rights organization providing A.F. with legal support, said the exam results were “negative”and that despite searching through his phone and social media accounts, prosecutors presented no evidence against A.F. at all.

    But they have pursued charges nonetheless.

    On February 11, the first instance court in Sfax will hand down its verdict on whether A.F. is guilty of same-sex sexual relations under article 230 of the penal code, which carries a penalty of up to three years in prison. Meanwhile, Baabou said, A.F.’s rapists walk free.

    Article 230, whose terms violate privacy and non-discrimination rights, is also wellspring of other abuses. Human Rights Watch research on arrests for alleged same-sex conductin Tunisia has found that police enter homes without warrants, search through phones, and elicit forced confessions.

    They also order forced anal examinations, despite Tunisia’s pledge to the United Nations Human Rights Councilto stop using them. Authorities sometimes claim victims “consent” to such exams. But consent to such an abusive exam from a detained person, when refusal might be taken as an indication of guilt, has little meaning.

    Tunisia should uphold its commitment to human rights and stop subjecting its citizens to such brutal indignities. Tunisia’s presidential commission on individual freedomshas called for the repeal of article 230 and a prohibition on forced anal exams. President Beji Caid Essebsi has maintained silence on the matter. He should stand up for sexual assault victims like A.F. and for the privacy rights of all Tunisians.

    https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/02/09/rape-victim-lands-behind-bars-tunisia
     
  3. Laura2014

    Laura2014 Well-Known Member

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    This still sends chills down my back. I was there just a few weeks before. It was after Bardo but before Kantoui. I never felt safe there even before this. I’m incredulous that I ever went there alone. The airport was totally disorganised hundreds of tourists queuing up outside to get into the airport with one single X-ray machine, so tourists were sitting targets standing outside. There was one lone security guard at the airport entrance who was just sitting usung his phone. Security guards at the gates to the hotels sitting in a hut smoking and playing with their phones. The whole security system was a joke. Never before and never again would I ever take a risk like this. I plead temporary insanity your honour.
     
  4. Heidi

    Heidi The Sleuth

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  5. Laura2014

    Laura2014 Well-Known Member

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    Justice and human rights should never be written in the same sentence in Tunisia. Lawlessness, bigotry and subhuman behaviour is the norm.
     

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